Another mother and I had a surprising conversation about a year ago. That is, it was surprising to her. While we were chatting mother to mother she shared how she had just discovered the idea of understanding her children instead of punishing them.
Screaming, crying and talking back are all traits that were immediately removed from the equation and replaced with smiles, genuine conversations and explanations. Yes, we yell, but then it's followed up with the why's and why not's.
Chad L. Coleman -- an actor who famously played Tyreese on "The Walking Dead" and Cutty on "The Wire" had a complete meltdown
"I'm crying because you are yelling at me!" said Liam when I told him to stop. "I'm yelling at you because you are crying," I said. Which not only underlined the absurdity of the situation, but made me feel so proud of my parenting and my ability to manage myself and a 9-year-old. Sigh.
You may be surprised to hear how many parents secretly struggle with rage, even ones who seem to have it all together often confess privately to me that they are ashamed of how often they lose their temper with their children, often over seemingly small things.
Wondering how to improve your team's employee engagement and productivity at work? An engaged, productive workforce is the lifeblood of company success. But sometimes leaders take the wrong approach and end up harming their workforce culture instead of nurturing it.
Often during the early days of The Orange Rhino Challenge, when I found myself struggling and wanting to quit because I felt it was too late to stop yelling and that my kids would always remember the awful times I had yelled in the past.
As a gift for my dad this Father's Day (an odd gift, I know, but trust me, it's a good one), and as a way to offer hope that it isn't too late to stop yelling, I share this story with you.
I stumbled upon The Orange Rhino No Yelling Challenge. The mom blogger chose to challenge herself to 365 days of no yelling at her kids. That same day I took the challenge to not yell. That decision to stop yelling seemed to give me the clarity needed to get other important areas of my life straight. Here's what happened next.
I'm not perfect, but I am a person and I would like to teach them how to be just that: real and open and unafraid of the mess of humanity.
We want to raise children who are resilient to adversity, loss, and addiction and mental health problems. But spanking is not the tool that is going to achieve the desired result.
I'm not proud of myself for yelling. In fact, I start each day with the notion that I'm not going to yell... ever again. I'm going to be "easy-going" and "keep my cool" and impress upon my children that their mother is peaceful, serene and just.
Sometimes the yelling is funny, sometimes it's maddening and it's almost always (heaven help me for this confession I'm about to confess) annoying.
A new Wall Street Journal says that three out of four parents yell at their children once a month. I say four out of four parents are liars.
I want to be a mom who doesn't feel inadequate. Who doesn't look at her friends (and strangers) and say: Wow, they are great moms, why aren't I like them? But instead looks at them and says: Wow, they are great moms and so am I.