Yingluck Shinawatra

“You Are Not Equal” had a “tone” the commentators said. It was “offensive” and “hysterical” and “bitchy” and “condescending
The presidential nomination of former First Lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has received extraordinary attention across the globe. That heightened awareness has brought into focus how well other women - particularly in Asia - have done in terms of rising to political leadership.
Thailand long was characterized as the land of smiles: a friendly people, warm climate, and informal atmosphere all beckoned backpackers and businessmen alike. But politics has become less hospitable in recent years.
A cartoonish dictator out of a Gilbert and Sullivan comic opera runs a not-so funny junta which jails opponents and suppresses free speech. The recent bombing of a popular Hindu shrine in Bangkok should act as the famed fire bell in the night.
As Thailand endures the second year of yet another coup, King Bhumibol Adulyadej is approaching the 70th year of his reign -- and his health is reputedly poor. In this Southeast Asian kingdom of 67 million, the question on everyone's mind is: When the music stops and the world's longest-serving monarch is gone, what -- or who -- will fill the void?
Thailand's best hope is genuine constitutional reform. Government power should be limited, especially to award economic favors. Federalism should rule, giving provinces more authority to serve communities at odds with the national government.
ARMY CHIEF SAYS RESPECT DECISION A decision to ban Yingluck from politics would require three-fifths of the NLA vote. Thailand
Thailand's capital has lost none of its frenetic motion or relaxed informality. But it is a bit quieter of late, with last year's demonstrators dispersed by the military. However, the junta, which took power in May, is not leaving.
Without real and continuing steps towards resolving problems and the will to stay the course for human rights and civil liberties, the country will become darker than ever.
As somebody who has a close kinship with the people and business leaders of Thailand, I'm heartbroken by the recent military coup. Over the past couple of years, I have spent a great deal of time in Bangkok on speaking tours and working with the emerging professional class.
Thailand's year of living dangerously may be grinding to a conclusion. But is it moving to another stage -- or just another venue?
Over the past century, Thailand has endured colonial aggression, two world wars and neighboring civil wars on every one of its borders.
The protesters have been rallying since November to try to oust Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, whom they view as a proxy
I can't help but think about Jackson here in Bangkok, where pro-government "red shirts" and anti-government "yellow shirts" are clashing, reenacting their own version of "King Mob."
The use of colors to identify the sides in a conflict is certainly nothing new. The U.S. Civil War was a contest between the Union blues and the Confederate grays. The Russian civil war following the Bolshevik revolution of 1917 pitted the Reds against the Whites.
"Backdoor negotiations are needed because both sides will avoid any direct confrontation in public view. The business lobby
The opposition's animosity towards the incumbent is certainly understandable given Yingluck's government is de facto ruled
BANGKOK, Dec 9 (Reuters) - Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra said on Monday she would dissolve parliament and hold
Officially, Yingluck Shinawatra is the prime minister. But it is her brother, exiled former prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra, who calls the shots via Skype from his homes in Dubai and London. Part of the reason the power-sharing works is that the same brilliant advisor is close to both.
The king's softly spoken words made Obama smile at one point. "Elections in the United States are very long but it's very