young-adult-cancer

The email flashes across my screen in bold, black type: B got married on the weekend. So... how are you doing?" How am I
I didn't take the symptoms seriously because they all seemed to make perfect sense. I had detailed and logical explanations for all the changes I was experiencing in my body. Those explanations seem ridiculous now, considering I know how serious my symptoms were.
As Vice President Joe Biden prepares to host the "National Cancer Moonshot Summit" on June 29 to discuss cancer research
And as it turned out, Kalina wasn't the only one who thought that way. Never a bad idea. Avoid gifting nuts. Just in case
I spoke at the congress about the innovative ways we can address the needs of adolescents and young adults living with metastatic and/or advanced cancer. Here are six summary items I think you should know about the conference:
A triangle shape can be as sturdy as a square. At first, it might be difficult to trust that the three-legged table will be as strong, as balanced, as safe as the four-legged one was. But it can be done. That table can be redesigned, remade, resilient. This is what happened to us.
So this week, during National Young Adult Cancer Awareness Week and in all the weeks to come, I'm raising my bright orange card with my name and patient number and demanding that I be counted.
I often hear, "I'm so happy you're done with treatment! Now you can get back to where you were." The latter is simply is false. My life will never go back to the way it once was. My challenge now is to figure out what my new life looks like.
Every person's grief is unique. How you choose to honor the passing of a loved one is up to you. If I could say one thing to others dealing with loss in the midst of these festive times, it would be this: Give yourself permission to live through the holidays however you need to.
Please don't get me wrong. I am so incredibly thankful I am surviving after my cancer diagnosis and treatment. But at the same time, I'm ready to be so much more than just the girl who survived cancer. I'm ready to simply be me.
Weeks later, glaring at the homeless man on the street, I realize that in this moment I have lost my ability to feel compassion
Not all surgeries, chemotherapies and radiation treatment options affect fertility and in some cases people assume that they are infertile, only to be surprised by an unplanned pregnancy after unprotected sex.
Now eight years after college I wonder if I could I ever do what Rachel did -- live with cancer without any possibility of a cure, all while never letting up on exclamation points?
We are in a different time period thanks to scientific discovery. Our health care system and our views of what cancer looks like need to expand to match up with where we are.
Regardless of age, having cancer is a difficult experience. Living with cancer as a young adult presents unique challenges, such as dealing with reduced or impaired fertility rates, disruptions in education plans, etc. However, being diagnosed with cancer as a LGBTQQ-identified person, involves other difficulties.
Last month, I headed south to Houston, Texas, to attend the Young Survival Coalition's (YSC) conference for young women affected by breast cancer and their supporters (who YSC have accurately dubbed, co-survivors). The theme of the conference this year (#YSC2015) was "young. strong. connected."
During my last health crisis back in October I know I wasn't a pleasant patient. I was in the hospital for two weeks (which
This is her story. ****** Many years ago, before time itself had awakened, people lived in this valley, secure in the understanding
I am a cancer researcher is a way of saying that you are empowered as a cancer patient.
Your desire to understand has always been so clear. It's one of your fiercest personality traits, and sometimes you and I butt heads over it. I've always known that you would want to understand this, and while we talked, it was as if I could see the gears working in your mind while you tried to sort it all out.