youth football

As noted here a week ago, the NFL reports that the number of concussions this season is down. Whether that drop is statistically
About a year ago in a column, I called out ESPN radio host Mike Golic for his on-air suggestions that football is as safe as it's ever been and for his unwavering support of "Heads Up." Sunday morning, I called him out again.
An adult choosing to play football in the NFL for a nice salary is a completely different situation than adults allowing children with developing brains to play.
The number of recent deaths among adolescent football players has helped bring about this change, the Somerville Recreation director says.
Many of those entering theaters this holiday season to watch this highly-promoted movie will only be marginally aware of the link between football, concussions, and CTE, the neurological disease resulting from repetitive brain trauma. A lot of them will be leave shocked at what they discover.
For me, football was a lifeline. And for many other NFL players, it was a lifeline. If it wasn't for football, a lot of us would be dead, or lost, roaming the streets somewhere. With all due respect, Dr. Omalu, football doesn't give us an opportunity to play a game. It gives us a chance at life.
My father was at the center of it all, making sure the large masses had their fill and left with a smile on their face. What I didn't comprehend at the time was that these gatherings weren't just parties; they were fundraising events for the local youth sports groups in which my brothers and I participated.
A multi-pronged approach to football safety, such as advocated by the AAP in its Policy Statement, and by the experts with whom I work on daily basis, is working. We just have to keep not just talking the talk, but walking the walk.
Tackling: in so many ways, it's what football is all about. Now, of course running, passing and scoring (and strategy) are important parts of football too. But it's tackling that stops the opponent. Without tackling, you can't play football. Or can you?
Participation in youth sports in general, and in youth football in particular, is on the decline in some parts of the nation. One of the biggest factors driving the decline is a concern about injuries.
Parents need know that times are a changing. The NFL and the youth organizations have heard your concerns about player safety and are taking actions to address them. As a result, youth football is getting a long overdue makeover.
Coach, your words of advice, "Arrive on time, prepared and ready to deliver a best effort," were met with an eager-to-please attitude from my 10-year-old son. When other young players neglected to demonstrate this same courtesy, your actions spoke louder than your words.
When it comes to great sports moments, Hail Mary touchdowns can't touch this. Walk-off home runs? Forget it. Even a March Madness buzzer-beater dulls in comparison. Chris Borland's retirement from the NFL blows them all away.
Football safety in America is a relevant topic with head injuries and long-term effects taking center stage. Everyone has an opinion. I'm sounding off as the mother of twin athletes who is more concerned about finding solutions than finding fault.
While you were all talking about "deflategate" last week, an important study was quietly published.
All sports, like life itself, involve risks. Unless we intend to keep our children by our sides, safe from the potential of injury, growing up entails dangers to life and limb.
Forgive my pessimism, but as long as football continues to attract these types of "You hit like a girl!" gorillas to teach the game to children, no amount of Heads Up football is going to make the sport safer.
Unfortunately, we are now seeing our young athletes dropping out of organized sports at record levels: according to an annual survey conducted by the Sports & Fitness Industry Association,
It was the waning moments of a damp September fourth quarter, and football, as it often does, had brought out the ugly side of one of its fans. In this case, the red-faced rooter was a 30-something dad.