youth soccer

I realized this week that there are some significant parallels between what happens on that field and what I see in my coaching practice with high impact women. These little soccer dynamos have a few behavior patterns that can shed some light on what we do as grownups.
Youth sports are being hijacked. Let's put it more directly -- your sports are being hijacked. The sports that your kids play are being taken over by a well-intentioned but misguided and counterproductive drive to make them better athletes in the hopes of attaining glory at "the next level" -- college, pro, the World Cup, etc.
Ryan: I loved playing soccer growing up. Checking the standings, seeing where our next game is at and even talking to my
The rulebook was changed in response to a 2014 lawsuit by parents and players.
We are advocates of organized sports. We firmly believe that sports (when balanced with other activities) gives children the opportunity to grow into well-rounded, confident, hard-working adults.
The USA has a mosaic of youth leagues, organizations and clubs, each doing things a little differently and often getting in each other's way. We're a democratic and capitalist country, and in soccer, we take those traits to the extreme.
Will soccer become the most popular sport in the United States? To Baby Boomers, that question is preposterous. "No way," many would answer. To Millennials, the answer to the question is not "If," but, "When?"
You must want the ball like you want chocolate cake for breakfast and breakfast cereal for dinner. Sure, sitting down and picking grass might look like a great idea when a player on the other team does it. But that is your chance to kick the ball while the other team is down.
As a father of four, a long-time soccer fan and a youth soccer coach, here are a few tips that can improve your enjoyment of the so-called beautiful game.
People often talk about the difficulties associated with parenting a child with autism. But this post isn't about that. I want to recognize and celebrate the upside of autism, a blessing we "special needs parents" are given somewhere, somehow -- packaged up in a gift I like to call "perspective."
"A parent who understood what was said complained and we expelled that coach from our league," said Pablo Lopez, coordinator
I hope you are enjoying seeing little Billy run around the field with his little soccer ball. I noticed one thing, though; you seem to have a lot to say, whether it's to me, the other parents, or the coaches. I kindly request that you shut your trap.
Parents have to help their children to discover the joy of healthy competition, but competition taken too far can lead to an attitude that everything is a competition and worth is based on winning and losing.