yuan

The U.S. has plenty of challenges at home, but an equal number of challenges abroad. Somehow, this has gotten lost in all
[Many bundle of Chinese yuan and US dollars are piled up in a bank in China. The Chinese yuan continues its devaluation./ Source
In such a fugue state, a "wag the dog" scenario in which the Chinese Communist Party tries to rally its citizens by attacking
The plunging Shanghai Stock Exchange and the sudden reversal in the yuan's appreciation have caused fears to spread beyond China's borders. Is something wrong with the world's growth locomotive? In a word, yes.
Currency traders and economists say the move should encourage Beijing to open up its financial system.
The Federal Reserve did not raise interest rates last month as many expected. Their reasons were understandable: one in 10 Americans remains unemployed, underemployed or so discouraged that they have fallen out of the labor force; and inflation remains consistently near zero.
The places that are affordable are the cities with the highest unemployment rates. And the cities where you can find a job, you might have to live in your car. Clearly something has got to give. For answers, I turned to Dr. Lawrence Yun, the chief economist of the National Association of Realtors.
Will the crisis be a wake-up call for African governments to speed up reform?
People may worry when a disease claims lives, but that worry doesn't make the disease's effects stronger or multiply the victim count. Investor sentiment, on the other hand, can and does cause market shocks to ripple outward.
In 2014, the Chinese economy became the No. 1 economy in the world, followed by the European Union and the U.S. The U.S. is now considered to be the third largest economy in the world.
At a time when income inequality is running rampant in the U.S., workers don't need even more "free" trade agreements that will further strip this nation's economy of middle-income jobs.
Chinese authorities claim this latest devaluation is simply their effort to let their currency be guided by market forces, something the U.S. and other countries have sought for many years. But the timing and the magnitude of the change suggests China's leaders fear their economy is about to roll over.
WASHINGTON -- The action taken by China, far from being a step to manipulate its currency, is actually an effort to let the RMB fluctuate according to the dynamics of the exchange markets.
Some fear the move could trigger a currency war.
I'm no currency expert. But coming on the heels of a ham-handed intervention in the stock market, the abruptness of the depreciation seems to be an obvious short-term move to increase export competitiveness. More worryingly, it is also a tacit admission that China's leaders are very nervous.