zaman

"We have become a society of anger, paranoia [and] intimidation. And artists, writers, academics -- people who have been trying to build bridges so as to promote coexistence and peace -- know that they have lost big time."
Only a few months after Turkey's President Erdogan raided the offices of the Koza Ipek Media Group, the Turkish police assaulted early this month the offices of Feza Publications, which owns two newspapers and two TV stations, without any warning.
Protests began after authorities seized control of the country's biggest newspaper.
Such is the disappointing state of the press in Turkey where the Erdogan administration's actions have rightfully earned the suspicion of the Turkish people and democratic nations across the globe that fear, with good cause, that the assault on the media is only the beginning. Not all is lost for Erdogan yet.
Turkish police raided media outlets and detained journalists nationwide on Sunday in operations against what President Tayyip Erdogan says is a network conspiring to topple him. The detentions came days after the government-sponsored bill was signed into law that made it possible to arrest suspects based on "reasonable doubt."