Asheville, North Carolina, celebrated its first "Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald Day" on March 10th. According to the Asheville Citizen-Times announcement, the day of events all over town featured much for everyone, and promises to be a bright annual springtime event on calendars to come.
Since the beginnings of film, literature has played a significant role in developing the medium. Adaptations are everywhere, but here are some literary tales that we hope inspire more stories on the silver screen.
Despite strife and money troubles, illness and depression and The Great Depression, their honeymoon went on for the next twenty years. If you don't believe that, just read Scott and Zelda's letters to each other.
In Beacon, New York, lies a stunning, gothic mansion -- once a mental institution, one that has not opened its doors in over
Zelda Fitzgerald is, still, best known as the wife of F. Scott Fitzgerald. True, Zelda was an inspiration for heroines and dialogue in his stories, and half of the golden couple of what Scott dubbed "The Jazz Age," but she was also an accomplished writer, and artist.
He died in Hollywood on December 21, 1940, eating a chocolate bar and making notes in pencil on a football story in the Princeton Alumni Weekly. The last words F. Scott Fitzgerald ever wrote complimented the author of the story: "Good prose."
Last week I joined close to 200 Fitzgerald scholars, admirers, students, readers, and teachers from all over the world -- though readers, and admirers, serves to define us all.
A new memoir has begun in the Believer magazine, with the first installment just published. It's by Robert Atwan, writing as "Thomas Buchanan." Yes, that Tom Buchanan, Daisy's husband, Nick's Yale frenemy, Gatsby's nemesis.
The "crazy" Zelda that has emerged in our popular imagination is as much Scott's making as The Great Gatsby itself. This is, in and of itself, part of the F. Scott legacy. His work depended on Zelda's silence.
With all the fanfare around the new movie version of The Great Gatsby, directed by Baz Luhrmann with a screenplay by Luhrmann and Craig Pearce, it's a great time to go back to the book and be reminded of F. Scott Fitzgerald's elegant, graceful writing.
Thirty-nine years ago, as a very young Courier-Journal reporter, I traveled south by train to Montgomery, Alabama, to connect with the world that novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald and his wife, Zelda, knew in the early part of the 20th century.
Zelda and Fitzgerald meet at a country club dance in her hometown in Alabama 1918 when she's just seventeen years old. He's a young army officer full of ambition to become a famous writer, and she's a restless and slightly spoiled girl with an overwhelming sense of fun.