zester-daily

Pick up a pack of beef or a carton of eggs in any supermarket and the chances are the label will proudly display a bucolic farm scene and one of a range of positive sounding claims -- usually implying that the food is produced with animal welfare or the environment in mind.
What if you could buy a Granny Smith apple that tasted just like the real deal but wouldn't discolor if left on your plate? Would you care if the apple's genes were manipulated to reduce production of the enzyme responsible for browning?
Chocolate and its flavor begins with the work of farmers, not factories.
Kimbal Musk has an audacious plan to destroy America's appetite for junk food. His big idea? Plastic.
Agriculture is very risky in Africa, as people may grab your land, and farmers who resist are being evicted and killed
For as long as I can recall, my guilty pleasure was Jelly Bellies, a mouthwatering burst of exquisite flavor. Toasted Marshmallow. Cream Soda. Café Latte. Until last Halloween that is, when I discovered that my high-priced sugar fix was being used to game the democratic system.
I think it was Michael Pollan who once said, "Drink liquor. Far too much. Mostly absinthe."
"Every 30 minutes a farmer in India kills himself ..." This frightening fact is pointed out in "Bitter Seeds," the third documentary in "The Globalization Trilogy" directed by Micha Peled.
It is this devotion to nostalgia and religious attachment to the past that I can't help but think about every time I work with my Amish friend Ervin, a farmer of sweet sorghum whose crop is produced exclusively for my newly minted liquor: Sorgrhum: America's First Sweet Sorghum Spirit.
New York, San Francisco, Chicago, Los Angeles -- every major American city is chockablock with painfully noisy but nonetheless popular restaurants.