Zine El Abidine Ben Ali

Khawla Ben Aïcha wants to amend sodomy laws used against gay Tunisians.
Britain’s biggest arms manufacturer BAE secretly sold mass surveillance technology to six Middle Eastern governments repeatedly
While Tunisia has been held up as a model of democratic transition since its 2011 uprising, the country is also caught up in a struggle with Islamist militancy.
TUNIS, Tunisia -- Exactly five years after the Arab Spring, Tunisia's revolutionary achievements have disappeared. Once considered the country that resisted the chaos that took over most of the MENA region after 2011, it seems to be sliding back into its pre-revolutionary situation. There is only one cause for this: poor leadership.
Could it possibly be that a Bush III administration will revive the use of torture against the Islamic state, an organization that owes its existence to the U.S.'s disastrous occupation of Iraq? And so our country prepares to wrong the wrongs of the past.
The dream of a country untainted by corruption has remained a powerful vision ever since. It is hard to imagine a more demoralizing step for Tunisians than suddenly telling them that they need to make their peace with a kleptocracy.
At 88 years old, Béji Caïd Essebsi, leader of Nida Tunis, was the favorite to win the presidential election. He held several
The launch of the Truth and Dignity Commission in June marks a turning point in Tunisia's transition -- a groundbreaking step toward justice in a country that has experienced many human rights abuses, particularly during the reign of its last dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.
Declaring a desire to stand "shoulder to shoulder" with Iran in combating terrorism, and driven by Turkey's evolving policy toward Syria, Erdoğan's trip highlighted Ankara and Tehran's tendency to pursue mutual interests when their paths cross.
While those in Western countries may wonder what is meant by "transitional justice," in societies emerging from a period of mass abuse -- such as systematic torture, massive disappearances and crimes against humanity -- the question of how to address past abuses is an urgent one, particularly for victims.
While Tunisia has been spared the large-scale human rights abuses and chaotic turmoil of the other post-Arab Spring states, a growing al Qaeda presence threatens to destabilize the country and undermine the democratic aspirations that fueled the Jasmine Revolution.
Women and Islam have become the heart of the current debate as post-revolutionary Arab countries struggle to define their new identities. Getting lost in this debate is the discussion of poverty, jobs and dignified life -- the very reasons that the uprisings occurred.
People call him "The Godfather of the new Islamist Middle East." Rachid Ghannouchi, whose Ennahdha party won Tunisia's first free elections last November, does indeed spearhead the post-Arab Spring Middle East.
Are Middle East dictators and other leaders, including a dead one, giving New York's Mayor Michael Bloomberg advice? These letters reveal the secret.
The uprisings of the Arab spring have brought renewed attention to long-standing accusations that kleptocratic regimes throughout the Middle East have plundered their nations' assets. But recovering those assets remains a daunting challenge.
Algeria embraced the popular overthrow of Benali and Mubarak with happiness and pride. More onerously, however, these developments are a sobering reminder of Algeria's recent history.
I spoke with April Longley Alley, Crisis Group Senior Analyst for the Arabian Peninsula, about Yemen's political scene and what comes next for the country, with or without Saleh.