Zolpidem

For most people, the best long-term strategy is to develop a strong, sustainable sleep routine that does not rely on prescription sleep medication. There's no question this takes work, but the rewards are worth it. Your sleep, your overall health -- and perhaps your memory -- will be better for it.
These last findings are particularly troubling, indicating that among the millions of people using sleep medications, there are many who are using multiple medications at once, putting them at greater risk for complications and adverse reactions.
The Dec. 9, 2013, issue of The New Yorker published a detailed but rather misguided article by Ian Parker, "The Big Sleep," about the complicated tangle of profit, science, and psychology in the search for better drugs to aid sleep.
There's more news about complications that can arise from prescription sleep medication: Side effects from a common prescription sleep aid are sending increasing numbers of people to emergency departments.
Last week, a study was released with some staggering news about the potential growth of a danger associated with prescription sleeping pills -- Ambien, in particular.
Visits to the emergency department linked with the sleeping pill zolpidem, commonly known by the brand name Ambien, have
Last week, the Food and Drug Administration issued an announcement that could affect millions of Americans who take some of the most common medications for sleep.
So what do you think? Is taking Ambien worth the risk? Let me know on Twitter, Facebook, or leave your comments right here
HuffPost Senior Science Correspondent discusses the risks and benefits of the popular sleep aid Ambien.
In 2005, Ayanda Nqinana of Johannesburg was traveling alone along an Eastern Cape road when his car crashed, News 24 reports
A recent study in the journal BMJ Open showed that people who take 18 or fewer sleeping pills a year have a 3.5 times higher