Latino Voices

Looming Supreme Court decisions that could scrap or fundamentally alter abortion rights have darkened this year’s commemoration of the landmark case.
"There is a whole side of this film that you did not see," the pop icon revealed during a Q&A following a recent British screening.
The GOP is radicalizing against democracy, and Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema bucked their own party. U.S. democracy ultimately may not be able to fix itself.
Weigh-ins can sometimes lead to avoiding health checkups altogether. Here's how to ask your provider to skip the scale.
The Fox News host's attacks on the homeless are "so extreme and dangerous," one critic wrote.
Hardballing could make "situationships" and awkward "What are we?" conversations a thing of the past.
And then turn it into art. The Confederate monument, removed from a city park earlier this year, was at the center of a deadly white supremacist rally in 2017.
Poor people need insurance. Seniors need dental care. And there may not be money for both.
Will Democrats now finally change filibuster rules to protect voting rights?
It's widely understood that plastics litter the oceans and kill animals. But its huge and growing impact on global warming has evaded public scrutiny.
In April, police in Alameda, California, kneeled on Mario Gonzalez’s back for nearly five minutes before he died.
One agent who posted a video in a Facebook group of a migrant falling off a cliff to their death was not fired, as recommended, but given a 30-day suspension.
The "Hacks" actor kicks off Season 3 of his digital series, which examines pop culture through an unapologetically queer lens, on Nov. 2.
Reports of hate crimes against Asians increased 76% amid the pandemic, according to data from the FBI's latest Hate Crime Statistics report.
Reproductive justice advocates warned the country about a domino effect after S.B. 8 became law. It has already started.
According to a new report, women and people of color are still a long way from reaching proportional representation as TV creators, writers and directors.
Myrna Pérez, 47, will now be a lifetime judge on a U.S. appeals court.
An app would let domestic workers accrue pay they’re owed — but in practice rarely get — to take sick days or care for loved ones.
The Latina political trailblazer has served in Congress for three decades.