Bhagavad Gita

The apocalyptic worldview found in the Bhagavad Gita, a Hindu epic, is very similar to President Trump's chief advisor's.
It's often the first thing that comes to mind when people see me. At five feet four inches tall, I'm far below the average
Gita and Bible are both word of God. They are meant to teach us how to live our life according to how God ordained. Gita and Bible both have commandments which we should follow. In both scriptures, to love one another is the first commandment and welfare of fellow beings is the highest value.
Gita, Bible, Quran and Tripitaka often said to be the word of God by followers of various religions are the works of the Supreme Being. They describe how we are related to the ultimate God and how we should live our life so that we do not incur any kind of sins while doing what we must do. They describe how every work becomes worship when our heart is set upon the maker.
This crisis is of deep existential import, for it not only threatens the most vulnerable members of our human family, but also the very fabric of our planet itself.
By arguing whether modern scientific theory is superior to faith based on ancient scriptures, we find excuses to ignore the fact that there is something that goes far beyond both theory and faith: truth.
What I've learned from my journey is that happiness does not come from the quest to be extraordinary, a subjective outcome I have no control over. It comes from being myself and giving what I have to offer.
Popular wisdom, from doctors and moms alike, is that yoga and happiness go hand in hand. Photographs and renditions of enlightened
After all our worldly effort, we want to enjoy the fruits of our work. We are attached to enjoying the results of our activities, and this attachment motivates how we walk in the world. Unfortunately, action motivated by this attachment is not conducive to sitting in meditation.
To better understand this sentiment, I decided to research a couple of key scriptures: the Christian Bible and the Hindu
When I started taking science courses a couple of years ago, I began with astronomy. We learned that our universe started with a bang, a sound vibration that expanded and continues to expand to this day.
The light at the threshold of the home on the night of Diwali is there to remind us that our awakening to the light of God in our hearts is incomplete if it does not radiate from within us to the darkness of the world outside.
When I lay down in my comfortable apartment in Budapest, Hungary, all I could see in my mind are images of babies and little children lying on the dirty floor of Budapest's railway stations, or a damp field near the border waiting for their transfer to a new, safer and better life.
I first became aware of the Bhagavad Gita in the mid-1960s. I was a college student taking my first tentative steps onto my spiritual path, reading all I could about the Eastern traditions.
As a Capricorn, I'm a mountain goat at heart -- persistent and tenacious. I charge headfirst up a mountain and yearn to dive into the deep-end. But then my shoulders shook and I wobbled in my handstand.
Discrimination, whether raced-based, caste-based, gender-based, or religion-based is just plain discrimination and it springs from ignorance and has no spiritual value. It only serves to distance us from other human beings and from God. It breeds more hatred and disunity inside of the person discriminating.
I immediately found that nothing made sense to me but moving on my mat, preferably in community. With a solid career in the
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