PostBourgie

Our need for the first annual observation of No Shame Day on Monday, July 2 could be traced to any number of get-right-quick antidotes. Despite the growing number of mental illness diagnoses in the black community, many are loath to accept their legitimacy.
The cloud of chronic traumatic encephalopathy -- the concussion-related brain disease that had led to mental illness and Alzheimer's-like symptoms -- hangs over the apparent suicide of Junior Seau, one of the N.F.L.'s great linebackers. The news was the final straw for Ta-Nehisi Coates of the Atlantic, who wrote that he could no longer find enjoyment in watching football with the increasingly grim prospects for its long-term practitioners, and so he was giving it up.
As you might have heard by now, President Barack Obama has expressed his belief that gay people should be able to get married. I want to take a moment to talk about the terms of the discussion. My concerns can fit broadly under what I'll call The Equality Problem.
There is a vague idea rolling around the internet ether, which posits that expressing objections to the ways people display
Here's Marvin Gaye, who would have been 73 today, performing "I Want You" while lounging on the couch in a Belgian hotel room. Epic.
It's about time that we got a Shirley-centric episode. Yvette Nicole Brown, aside from her ping-pong rivalry with Jeff, has been pretty quiet this season.
Colored TV is a new PostBourgie feature that looks at television series through the lenses of race and class. Up first: "Parenthood" and "Revenge."
In time for Martin Luther King Jr. Day last month, Yasiin Bey (formerly known as Mos Def and not to be confused with the
Jeremy Lin is much more than a fortune cookie. Treat him as such.
Let's not think of it as a defense of Brown. Let's consider it a plea for worthier troubled souls.