Ramadan

As the coronavirus pandemic offers time to step back, Muslim Americans rethink how mosques can be more welcoming to women and adapt financially.
Despite the lockdown, Muslims across the country find ways to celebrate the holiday marking the end of Ramadan.
People of faith around the world are turning to prayer during the Covid-19 pandemic. But why exactly do we pray? It turns out, prayer isn’t just about religion. And while the ways people pray vary widely, the basic human need to reach out to something outside of ourselves is universal.
The flower moon and life amid the coronavirus pandemic round out this week's best images.
Michigan families decorate their homes with lights so that even as they can't meet, Ramadan's festive spirit brightens their neighborhoods.
"At this time of need ... Ramadan brings hope for people."
FROM HUFFPOST CANADA
Muslim Americans are forced to get creative in order to make the most out of Ramadan.
Ramadan is usually a month filled with family, friends and festive feasting. But the spread of COVID-19 may cast a pall over the month's beloved social rituals.
Nearly every major religion has an important holiday in April — which means it will be a month of surreal new changes for American believers.
With Ramadan only a month and a half away, Muslim Americans are having to rethink everything from Friday prayers to planning Hajj.