Tisha B'Av

2. Mourn the victims of humanity's brutality in times past. Those who do not study the past are doomed to repeat it, Santayana
This is my first contribution to the Huffington Post so let me introduce myself. I am the Executive Director of Jews for
Jews are in mourning. They have been, at this time of year, for nearly 2000 years, and more. Every year they recall that their most sacred site, the Jerusalem Temple, was destroyed at this time.
This week, Jews around the world are marking Tisha B'Av, a day of mourning for all that is broken in ourselves and in our
In this world where so much seems beyond our will, what is within our grasp to hold on to?
Someday, the Ninth of Av will change from a day of destruction to a day of celebration. How can we speed up the process?
This year, amidst the war that rages on the ground, in the shattered remnants of our hearts, we believe the world needs an extra Shabbat of Comfort, an extra dose of compassion, an extra week to seek comfort for all of God's fragile creation.
In Jewish tradition, on this very day of disaster Mashiach (Messiah) was born, but hidden away till a generation would come that is ready to make peace and eco-social justice in the world.
A few days ago I downloaded the "Code Red" app to my phone that Israelis use to follow the thousands of rockets being launched over the border from Gaza. Over the course of thirty minutes the phone sounded more than 10 times.
How can we draw on the ancient wisdom of Biblical Israel as an indigenous people in sacred relationship with the Earth? How can we use this storehouse of wisdom toward helping heal all Humanity and Mother Earth today, from a crucial planetary crisis threatening the very life and health of all of us?