War

The president warned that drug cartels were working to "exploit" the country as officials said more than 4,000 people had been killed by COVID-19.
President Donald Trump is almost certain to veto the measure, however.
Sudan's transitional authorities have agreed to surrender all those wanted in connection with the Darfur conflict.
The president's son rekindled the "war on Christmas" rhetoric at a press conference in Iowa.
President Donald Trump is expected to veto the measure, however.
New motivation emerges after contradictory Trump administration accounts of "imminent" threats justifying airstrike assassination.
The House approved a war powers resolution to limit President Trump's ability to escalate tensions with Iran on the same day.
Amid tensions with Iran, Omar, who was a refugee, spoke of her post-traumatic stress. A congressman called it “offensive” to vets who “really do have” PTSD.
The war powers resolution approved Thursday, however, is unlikely to tie President Donald Trump's hands.
Critics slammed GOP Rep. Doug Collins for saying Democrats are “in love with terrorists.”
Ironically, lawmakers are more hesitant to exercise their constitutional prerogatives when the threat of war is greatest.
One person snarked back at the president, "Which law? Name one."
President Donald Trump had been threatening to commit a war crime by launching such attacks.
Defense Secretary Mark Esper said America would "follow the laws of armed conflict" if tensions with Iran escalate.
Destroying culturally significant sites would likely constitute a war crime, and for good reason.
Destroying cultural property during armed conflict is considered a war crime under international law, one the U.S. has decried in the past.
The president, who ordered the assassination of Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani, appeared to mock the War Powers Act of 1973 in his tweet.
The measure would restrict federal funding of any offensive military action against Iran “without congressional authorization.”
U.S. troops were “attacked by a Taliban-led terrorist insurgency that Defendants helped finance" by paying protection money, the suit charges.
"I saw Eddie take a shot at probably a 12-year-old kid," one SEAL told investigators.