Zone 3

Everyone's situation is different, but the goals should be the same.
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At bulk stores, stick with meat, dairy and produce.
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It's not just about tuition, although that's a major factor.
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Your kid can get discounts from Apple to Amazon and beyond.
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One-quarter of families don't bother completing the FAFSA ― and end up missing out on billions in financial aid.
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For high schoolers and college students, this can be a great idea.
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“Sure kids cost roughly $14,000 annually, but think about all the money you save from no longer having a social life.”
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It's not all up to Mom and Dad.
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Are you creating a future opportunity or a future problem?
Spoiler: There are usually financial consequences for stupidity.
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The pay gap has trapped generations of women. But there’s another way.
That little white lie could be flat-out fraud.
You were picked on a lot as a student in college — by your credit card company, insisting that you pay on time. And now your college student is picking a credit card.
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By the time your child gets a job, they should know to avoid these traps.
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It really comes down to how you manage your debt.
It might be worth hiring an accountant if your tax return just got more complicated.
Smart ways to handle money with your teenager from high school to college. A HuffPost Life series supported by Relay.
"Amazon is buying Whole Foods for 13.7 billion dollars. And that's just the price of the apples!"
If you’re going to ignore conventional wisdom and prioritize your kid’s college over retirement, do it carefully.
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Bank accounts, budgeting, taxes – you and your teen have a lot to think about.
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An estimated 3 million more Americans will owe taxes on April 15.
Affordable banking is for the rich, and that's one reason it's so expensive to be anything else.
Those who hawk advice for a living often put their own financial interests ahead of yours.