19th century

Wolf and BBC host Matthew Sweet handled the awkward situation remarkably well.
Meet the inventor of this steam-powered motorbike!
I didn't know I loved Jane Eyre until I began teaching it. You would think that after hours of research and hundreds of student papers, there would be nothing new to say about a novel nearly two centuries old.
In her Broadway debut, Keira Knightley brilliantly embodies this tormented monster -- the titular protagonist/antagonist of Thérèse Raquin. She fumes, and rages, and withdraws, and you can watch her psychological evolution from stifled wife to impassioned mistress to haunted murderer.
As you approach the Linda Gross Theater, you're struck by the imposing quiet of it. Sealed doors keep out the faint of heart; the Church-like building sleeps, bathed in the light of an October moon. Could this be your destination, or have you made a mistake?
In Spring Awakening, Steven Sater's lyrics sing like poetry. Their intimacy tingles in your throat as you repeat them under your breath. Your eyes close, just long enough to dance on the brink of surrender.
Right now, we're in a Jane Austen golden age - a brief window of history in which we have the time and resources to form good marriages (or marriage-like arrangements) and before the science fiction future makes relationships fantastically baroque.
My book depicts Brooklyn in the early 1870s, when three young women were detained on charges of murder in its jailhouse on Raymond Street. In that decade, Brooklyn was not lost, but frequently found in newspaper pages across the country.
Redditor Shane Kent came across his great, great, great grandmother’s autograph book from 1892, which is something of an equivalent to a modern high school yearbook. In it, he found words of advice written to his ancestor Agnes Nevin, who was just fourteen at the time, living in Livermore, California.
Life is a series of deaths and rebirths. Death happens to our bodies every minute of every day yet; this process goes unnoticed because we are busy living life. Cells die. Skin dies. But the thought of the ultimate death stops us dead in our tracks.
I've lived on the same block in Greenwich Village nearly all my life and for a good part of it next door to Annie Leibowitz. So when the cat that anchored the front of the house disappeared, I knew something was up. It probably sensed Annie was selling up and left first.
Names of cities are not just collections of letters. When you read "Rome" or hear "Hanoi" you get a firecracker flash. A row of mental lightbulbs pops on, you see a private marquee picture of the place, and then, when you think of something else, it's gone.
Follow LiveScience on Twitter @livescience. We're also on Facebook & Google+. The new discovery gives a very human identity
Host and Duke University Professor Mark Anthony Neal is joined in the Left of Black Studios by Maurice O. Wallace, Associate Professor of English and African-American Studies at Duke University.
Several of the letters are addressed to a "man of color" named Reuben Faulkner and a colored servant named Violet Ware, according
In the unbelievable cornucopia of riches that is the New York classical music scene we had three recent examples of the latter sort of tenor -- all excellent.
"Dementia Risk Seen in Players in N.F.L. Study," The New York Times, Sept. 30, 2009: A study commissioned by the National
The film, in short, is sweet, sad, and moving but with Campion's astringent edge keeping the proceedings from lapsing into sentimentality. And that makes all the difference.