herman melville

Every year for 20 years, this whaling museum has hosted a marathon reading of Herman Melville's classic.
Whether one is searching for a window of opportunity, hoping to ride a groundswell of support, or participating in an established grassroots movement, the importance of seizing the moment and making the most of its potential can never be underestimated.
Perhaps you know his name from his book Jesus: The Human Face of God, or perhaps you know him as author of The Last Station, which was turned into an Academy Award-nominated film.
As Ron and John chart a course for their most ambitious animated feature to date through those treacherous, shark-filled waters that are known as modern motion picture production.
Fueled by the riches of 19th century whaling captains, the church fell into disrepair after that money disappeared. Until now. Margo Datz has restored to Edgartown its glorious heritage.
Standing ovations are so prevalent they are meaningless. The consensus is that ticket buyers paying so much for a seat rise at curtain calls in order to convince themselves they've just gotten their money's worth. There are occasions, however, when standing O's are indisputably meaningful.
Good news: the written word thrives downtown. The brainchild of Doctor Amanda Foreman, the author of historical works like
Abe-who? Not for nothing have some of the world's most famous authors dwelt literarily on and physically in the islands of
Over the years, mad Ahab in Herman Melville's most famous novel, Moby-Dick, has been used as an exemplar of unhinged American power, most recently of George W. Bush's disastrous invasion of Iraq. But what's really frightening isn't our Ahabs.
When we started the Books that Shaped Work in America project, we said that the list, like work in America, was constantly evolving, and that the list would grow based on suggestions from "the public."
It is a grand shame Typee is neglected, all that reading pleasure given away to books that may not deserve your hours in quite the same way. Even with the best readers I know I get a dumbfounded expression when I bring up Typee.
A '20s renaissance developed around Jake and his bookstore next to the downtown library and in his Echo Park digs. Later after the war Anais Nin, and presumably Henry Miller and Bukowski, hung around in the very same hills of Echo Park.
In either case, it's the overwhelming consensus of almost everyone else, both Republicans and Democrats, both in Washington and around the country, that Senator Cruz has long since missed the forest for the trees. In fact, he appears to be staring at a single leaf.
New Bedford was and is an epic city in every sense of the word -- something that cannot be said of many other prettier, more popular Coastal New England destinations -- and the very reason I love visiting.
As it has always happened in New York, time did its thing. What felt eternal and reliable turned out to be fragile and ephemeral.
Use the extra hours you'll gain to read a truly good book. I realize it is a novel and retro idea, but think about it. Become, as a reader, what Flaubert became as a writer.
As someone whose heroes are almost exclusively literary, it is hard to describe the emotions I felt discovering the love affair that occurred in the summer and fall of 1851 between Emily Dickinson and Herman Melville.
No bright line marks the boundary between illness and health. At the extremes it is easy to diagnose mental illness accurately and to distinguish it from normality. At the fuzzy border, it is impossible.
I once read somewhere that James Joyce's novel Ulysses was the best book ever written, so a few years ago when I found an old copy for a dollar, I bought it.