This article exists as part of the online archive for HuffPost Canada, which closed in 2021.

Maia Lappano Writes Letter To 'Sientists' Asking Them To Bring Back Woolly Mammoths

Maia Lappano insisted on writing to a group of scientists working on bringing mammoths back.

Jon-Erik Lappano said when his daughter Maia realized she would never see a real-life woolly mammoth, she was close to tears.

The Guelph, Ont. dad said he and four-year-old Maia had a talk about the ice age, climate change, and evolution, which led her to ask, "So I'll never see one? Not ever?"

He told Maia there were a group of scientists working on bringing mammoths back, and she insisted on writing to them.

So Maia asked 'The Sientists' to please find a woolly mammoth egg and put it inside an elephant.

Maia Lappano's letter to McMaster University scientists, complete with stickers. (Photo: Jon-Erik Lappano/McMaster University)

Lappano sent the note to Henrik Poinar, the head of ancient DNA investigations at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont.

Poinar is part of a team that mapped out the woolly mammoth genome last year.

Lappano said the scientists wrote back to Maia, sending her a piece of mammoth tusk and passes to the Ontario Science Centre.

Maia Lappano holds her letter from McMaster University. (Photo: McMaster University)

McMaster posted Maia's letter on the university's website and on the Ancient DNA Centre website.

Follow The Huffington Post Canada on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Also on HuffPost

Renegade Pictures/Smithsonian Channel
Dr. Tori Herridge, a paleobiologist at the Natural History Museum in London, with mammoth tusks.
Renegade Pictures/Smithsonian Channel
Dr. George Church, a molecular geneticist at Harvard, with a GGI reconstruction of a woolly mammoth.
Renegade Pictures/Smithsonian Channel
Dr. Roy Weber, a biologist at Aarhus University in Denmark, holding mammoth blood during autopsy.
Renegade Pictures/Smithsonian Channel
Mammoth carcass during autopsy.
Renegade Pictures/Smithsonian Channel
Insung Hwang, a cloning researcher at the SOOAM Biotech Research Center, with mammoth during autopsy.
Renegade Pictures/Smithsonian Channel
Mammoth teeth, shown during excavation of carcass in Siberia.

Suggest a correction
This article exists as part of the online archive for HuffPost Canada. Certain site features have been disabled. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.