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financial planning

There's no shame in food bank visits, say a dietitian and a financial expert.
Regardless of whether it's a lot or a little, if you're about to come into money, here's how to make sure you hold on to it.
Whether you're a penny pincher or independent thinker, sometimes you just want to DIY. But pulling an amateur move on a repair
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If you take a peek at the daily agendas of high-powered executives and entrepreneurs, you'll see a number of commonalities
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Dealing with tips There may be no greater perk for hospitality servers than finding a sizeable tip on a settled bill. But
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Are you a natural at handiwork, brain-teasers, sports, cooking, directions... the list goes on. And on. Or are you stubbornly
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Friends are always looking out for each other, but sometimes your bestie’s help can be more than you bargained for. You may
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Get into a routine to avoid a rush Let's be real: Trying to root through a year's worth of financial info in one fell swoop
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Unfortunately, we will all experience a parent who becomes ill and/or passes away, and over the next decade will see many people step into caregiver roles.
"It's too complicated." "I'm not good with numbers." "I want to save time." "My dad's been doing my taxes for years." We've
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5. Separate work from play Small business owners should be keeping tabs on gas receipts, but that doesn't mean you can write
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Photo: Lemontree Photography Inc. For their wedding, these lovebirds reallocated $5,000 worth of savings originally intended
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You could have $52,000 in tax-free savings by now.
The cost of living is increasing and frankly things are more expensive than they've ever been.​ ​Learning​ ​how​ ​to​ ​save
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Money talks. But how should couples talk about money?
Financial planning for a crisis isn't sexy, but it will save you from getting screwed.
Some employers may look at your credit score when applying for certain jobs.
Keep track of your expenses for two weeks and see how it lines up to your budget. It can be eye-opening to see where you're spending your money! Little things like bringing your lunch instead of buying it and brewing your own coffee at home instead of stopping on the way to work can add up. Walking or riding your bike to work can help you save on gas and parking while getting fit.
There have been government committees, discussions with the private sector and even a national strategy to teach Canadians basic personal finance. But when Statistics Canada data showed late last year that Canada's household debt is now larger than its GDP, it became painfully apparent that we're failing.