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gay rights

This London zoo is celebrating its (aquatic) same-sex couples for Pride.
The "Gaycation" star connects politicians' anti-LGBTQ rhetoric and a rise in hate crimes.
James Egan and many others are part of our heritage.
"We need stories where they just exist and get on with it."
We take the descriptor "straight acting" in our community and hold it up like a holy grail. If we can achieve this goal, we will finally be able to hide through camouflage. We are the beautifully broken, a cast of misfits simultaneously fighting ourselves, other gay men, and society, in a quest for survival.
Jason Kenney made the personal the political when he said parents should be notified when a kid joins their school's gay-straight alliance - which, of course, has the effect of outing them. Jason Kenney proposed one rule for gay kids, and an entirely different rule for guys like him. You know, like hypocrites do.
Ontario Pioneer Camp bans those counsellors who live an "out" lifestyle.
I don't know about you, but if I just created history for my country on a world stage and my fellow citizens reacted by calling me derogatory names that could potentially put my life in danger, I would seriously think about moving to another country. Sadly, Jamaican athlete Omar McLeod was not so lucky.
Dear Black Lives Matter Toronto, I approached your booth and said, "I would like to buy a shirt and make a donation," but your volunteer told me shirts are $20 and are only for sale to the black community. What baffles me is you really took the time to tell me I'm not the right race, colour or minority to purchase your T-shirts or support your organization. I replied, "That's not right" and left quickly, dumbfounded and shocked, trying to collect my jaw from the streets of Toronto.
This Ramadan we must be reminded that there are those who fast from intimacy and physical love all the time because they are gay and their circumstances or their mindset make it impossible for them to find and fall in love with a partner of the same gender. Muslim family -- we know this is not how life is supposed to be lived.
An estimated 50 people are dead following the events in Orlando because of hatred. Fifty people are dead because of ignorance. I am about to turn 30 in a few weeks and I want to believe that this world can become a more loving, more kind and more embracing world.
In the wake of this tragedy in Orlando, it is important that we Christians do something to show the world that we are outraged, that we care. Because honestly? We have not done a good job of showing love to the LGBTQ2 community.
We have become so complacent, thinking that because we got a few laws on the books that somehow we have achieved freedom and protection. Well, the shooting in Orlando has reminded the world that no gay person -- no lesbian, bisexual or trans person -- is free from homophobia.
When it comes to standing up for gay rights, corporate outrage is rather selective. Large companies that have publicly denounced new laws in several southern U.S. states as "anti-gay" are quite happy to remain silent as they carry on business in countries that criminalize gay sex.
Instead of focusing on the "stories of Sodom and Gomorrah" and using that in the same conversation about a horrific incident that has left many homeless here in Canada, you should go and find your heart because your comments are shameful and distasteful.
We know that LGBTQ students still face a difficult situation in schools and there's ample evidence to back this up. Recent research shows that 64 per cent of LGBTQ students in Canada don't feel safe at school and 70 per cent of all students say they hear anti-gay slurs and remarks EVERY SINGLE DAY.
I am often reminded of Martin Luther King, who uniquely demonstrated that eloquence trumps bigotry, when researching Canada's earliest LGBT activists. They, like King, were at the forefront of a dramatic civil rights movement, making powerful and persuasive arguments for social justice in the face of sometimes brutal suppression.
December 10 is celebrated internationally as Human Rights Day. It is therefore an ideal time to reflect on how Canada's LGBT were once so feared and loathed that -- until surprisingly recently -- discriminating against them was both common and legal.