Honduras Coup

In addition to military intervention in the internal affairs of Central and South American countries, economic trade policies
Imagine for a moment that a Bernie-like leader was elected the president of a Latin American country and that the U.S. feared he would adopt policies that were hostile to American corporate interests.
Hillary Clinton's support for "regime change" in countries such as Iraq, Syria, Libya and Iran has rightly become an issue in the presidential campaign. Honduras should also be included on the list of operations that ruined a country and disgraced the U.S. in the region.
Critics argue the secretary of state's efforts paved the way for the violence still plaguing Honduras.
According to the New York Times, Terror paralyzes. It silences and it divides. It pulls a veil over the intentions behind
In her speech claiming victory after the Iowa caucuses, Hillary Clinton proclaimed herself "a progressive who gets things done." I had to laugh. And it wasn't just because former President Bill Clinton -- the centrist Triangulator-in-Chief -- was standing behind her, beaming and clapping.
Some of the most important historical information for understanding current events comes, not surprisingly, from sources that were intended to be shielded from the public.
The Obama administration's prompt recognition of ruling National Party candidate Juan Orlando Hernandez, who is expected
We were invited among the many groups serving as monitors in hopes that these elections would not be plagued by the rigging and fraud that were seen in the 2009 sham. Unfortunately what my queer colleagues and I saw was anything but free and fair.
By Lauren Carasik and Azadeh Shahshahani Honduras' contested results from its Nov. 24 election threaten to unleash civil