Lawrence Kasdan

Ron Howard's drama-addled spinoff doesn't get Han quite right, but the movie is entertaining in a witless way.
She is brave, skilled, resourceful, determined. She has a past that is not spelled out for us but rather is left as a tantalizing mystery. She is no one's love interest, and is not defined by her relationships with or unrequited longings for any particular man. And she kicks tremendous ass.
There are few things certain in this world, but one of those few things I'm most excited about is that more Star Wars is coming. Next year sees the release of the first new Star Wars film in a decade and October sees the release of a brand new animated series in the world.
Speaking of Han Solo, in this version he's tasked with the duty of trying to convince his stepfather, a man named Ovan Marekal
Close to one year after being hired to write "Star Wars: Episode VII," Oscar-winning screenwriter Michael Arndt has departed
The new "Star Wars" trilogy is gaining another familiar face in John Williams, who composed the scores for all six of the
Since selling Lucasfilm to Disney, Lucas has stated publically that he will be a "creative consultant" on the upcoming sequels. I do think the new, Disney-owned Lucasfilm wants to distance itself from the prequels, judging from its decision to cancel The Clone Wars, a show that just won an Emmy. And a good way for Disney to distance itself from the prequels is to distance itself from the man who is responsible for the prequels, George Lucas. If that's what the new Lucasfilm is doing, it's making a huge mistake.
Of course, all of this is likely premature news for "Star Wars" fans. Disney and Lucasfilm still haven't hired a director
It's a gorgeous spring day in Manhattan, which seems to have both actor Kevin Kline and writer-director Lawrence Kasdan restless.
Kevin Kline and Diane Keaton play Joseph and Beth Winter, a long-married couple in Denver; he's a self-important spinal surgeon and she is the wife whose needs have always taken a back seat to his.
It's a few days before his film, Love and Other Drugs, reaches theaters and Edward Zwick is sipping tea, as calm as can be expected.