remakes

It's set for release Christmas 2016.
When I learned that the widely acclaimed Argentinian film, The Secret in Their Eyes (2009), was going to get an American remake, I felt perplexed, but not solely due to the usual mistrust one has for a remake's ability to best, or even do justice to, the original film.
Sci-fi is possibly the most hit-or-miss genre of film. Done right, it's a thing of beauty: tingling the senses and captivating the imagination. Done wrong, it's cold, tedious, or worse: campy schlock.
Life is short and fraught with tension. So, we should be able to just relax, and go to the movies, and spend $14.97 on popcorn
Long before his voice became an inescapable fixture on pretty much every one of your car radio's presets, Red Hot Chili Peppers vocalist Anthony Keidis was playing a surfer with attitude in the 1991 film "Point Break."
With a film so beloved, I guess it's inevitable that there would be a remake. But instead of being a toothless, needless, sanitized imitation, I'm happy to report that the new RoboCop is willing to make significant changes and swing even harder at its political commentary.
Here's everything you need to know about what's wrong with the movie industry today: This week, three remakes of movies that didn't need remakes -- or weren't very good in the first place -- will open on thousands of screens: Robocop, Endless Love and About Last Night.
Carrie has been remade, prompting many to ask why anyone would bother remaking a film that's still referenced today and is widely considered to be a horror classic. But here's the thing -- I don't really care about that since I've never seen the original Carrie.
In just the past few weeks I've found out the classic science fiction film Outland was slated for a remake. Then afterwards I checked further info about the remake of the film that starred Sean Connery, which all pertaining articles seeming to corroborate two facts.