HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

Electoral Reform

“Electoral reform must be implemented,” says one NDP candidate.
The NDP leader rejects the prime minister's arguments against electoral reform.
The criticisms mirror arguments over the Fair Elections Act.
The PM's comments in a radio interview have ruffled feathers.
While we have democracy in theory and a democratic process, we do not have democracy in practice.
The prime minister could have been honest with Canadians.
Guy Caron: "Electoral reform will not take place if we are lukewarm about it.”
159 Liberals voted against electoral reform report.
Long before Justin Trudeau spoke about electoral reform (ER), another Trudeau tackled the issue. It was in 1979 and that Trudeau was Pierre Elliot. The difference between the visions of the two Trudeaus is clear. One was based on how to make the federal system more robust and more representative, while the other was based on self (party) interest.
After all, you can hardly judge a book by it's cover, so why judge an entire party only on it's leader? As luck would have it every NDP MLA talked openly about anything we asked, and they all had issues they were passionate about.
Thanks to the federal budget presented by Finance Minister Bill Morneau, we saw not the self-described feminist, environmentalist, progressive Justin T, but the reigning prime minister of austerity and broken promises. Clearly, "sunny ways" for the "middle class" are no longer part of his weather forecast.
Particularly in a time when increased surveillance and privacy invasion concerns are on the rise, our role, as citizens, irrespective of our political stripes, should be to continue to press for our governments to be putting in place even stronger systems of independent, institutional governance, of checks and balances.
There needs to be a direct connection from the citizens to the elected official without all these special interests trying to skew the outcome of the election or trying to influence the voting intentions and platforms of the candidates. The end result would be elected officials who would be truly independent and can vote with their conscious and what is best for the citizens and their community.
In two referendums, one on each side of the border, residents of Maine voted in favour of switching the entire state over to ranked choice voting and two days earlier voters in P.E.I. embraced a system called mixed member proportional. Both of these systems offer distinct benefits to voters and offer a glimpse of hope that we can overcome the democratic deficit in both countries.
These town halls were unpredictable and, at times, the exchanges were intense. We shared frank conversations and emotional moments. But everywhere I went, I heard directly from you.
New Democrats pledge they won't give up.
Trudeau says he could not support proportional representation (PR), the system that would best ensure the popular vote is accurately reflected in the House of Commons. He claims PR would allow extremists to hold the balance of power in Ottawa. This is simply fear-mongering, unworthy of a prime minister.
If U.S. President Donald Trump's election south of the border has demonstrated anything, it's that the biggest political extremist threat comes not from small, radical parties on the fringes of political discourse, but from extremist politicians hijacking a major party and using its established legitimacy to validate their views.