abaya

Saudi Arabia’s Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice, aka “morality police,” have arrested a woman after she uploaded a video of herself visiting a historic fort in a mini skirt and crop top.
Last year,, mogul fashion house D&G made what Forbes noted was their "smartest move in years", when they launched a new collection
This is the hardest place for non-Muslim travelers to visit in the world. I spent 16 years, and 1000 cups of tea, trying to set foot here. It is worth the wait.
What these designers and the general public do not understand is that this "fashion" has been around for thousands of years. For these women, modesty is not the next trend, it is a choice and at times, a difficulty.
Dolce & Gabbana is setting precedence by disregarding the influence of bigotry inundating media outlets that is geared toward Muslims, by releasing a collection intended for a highly-scrutinized community during a very sensitive time.
True, more than 80 percent of Saudi women showed up at the polls on Dec. 12. But anyone assuming the kingdom is at long last liberating its women is deceived.
Perhaps, like everything else, there is no single meaning of the abaya for Muslim women across the globe.
The garment worn compulsorily during my years in Saudi Arabia had found a permanent place in my wardrobe as I realized, on careful deliberation, that the benefits far outweighed its limitations.
Coca Cola's "America the Beautiful" ad on Super Bowl Sunday aimed to be a celebration of diversity, showcasing the many ethnicities that make up our modern social fabric.
There was one instance where I knew I had come dangerously close to crossing an invisible line. I innocently asked a question of the assembled tourists and international workers known as expatriates, or expats. The chill I felt was stunning, and I immediately realized what I had done.
Tired of reading accounts by Western women journalists who visit Islamic countries, then write lengthy articles complaining about the "great suppression" and "discomfort" of the abaya, I am here to write in defense of the abaya.
France has now officially outlawed the Islamic niqab or burqa in public. Where's the liberté in that?
Having lived and traveled in the Middle East on and off since 1985, I was no stranger to seeing women covered in black... Yet I had never covered my face with the exception of the briefest attempts at trying the hijab.
For some governments, banning burqas about placing a legal element of moderation on public dress. Worldwide today, total nudity is usually illegal, these governments are simply saying that the other extreme is also not acceptable.
This is why Hissa Hillal's poetry is such a colossal cultural moment: not merely because one Saudi woman has had the courage to speak out, but because of the cascading, tumultuous conversation this will certainly uncork. Like a gathering storm, a cloudburst of cultural rebellion is mounting.
I wonder how it is that this smart, talented, presumably goodhearted group of people could have been so oblivious about traipsing around a misogynist oil sheikdom in eight-hundred dollar shoes.
I was told that non-Muslims could not visit mosques -- not even the one on the hotel grounds. Read more on nytimes.com
Something happened when I ducked into an airport bathroom to change into my Saudi uniform. It was depressing. It wasn't about color. It wasn't about style. It was about choice. About freedom.