brian de palma

It's all there in Noah Baumbach ("The Squid and the Whale") and Jake Paltrow's ("Young Ones") long take documentary on the 50 year career of one of America's great innovative film directors. Triumphs and tragedies, back stories and back stabbing, mostly brutally honest, sometimes euphemistically elliptical, straight ahead, unblinking testimony laced with great film clips and stories of the emergence of the American New Wave.
Directors Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow pay tribute to Brian De Palma in the best way possible in the documentary, De Palma
Poison Ivy (1992). Katt Shea directed this teenage version of Fatal Attraction (1987). With Drew Barrymore as the psycho
Now that the movie is 20 years old, have you still never noticed this?
The creators behind American Horror Story: Hotel should go back and do their homework. Scratch that: They should be given an F and expelled from Scary School.
At 53, a rather perilous age for an action star, Cruise shows no sign of slowing down. If anything, he's doubled down on the spectacular and daring-looking personal stunts.
Pierce's version is in most respects more realistically grounded. Whereas De Palma went for broader characterization, particularly in his villains, Pierce shows some nuance.
This Saturday marks a milestone for perhaps the finest screen actor of our times. Robert De Niro is turning 70.
I talk with legendary filmmakers, gay and straight alike, at the 15th annual Provincetown International Film Festival press luncheon, including Ed Lachman, John Waters, Brian De Palma, Christine Vachon, Mary Harron, Rob Epstein, Jeffrey Friedman, Malcolm Ingram, and Jeffrey Schwarz.