Evidence-based medicine

Stefaan G. Verhulst, New York University The modern era is marked by growing faith in the power of data. “Big data”, “open
Since the number doesn't seem to be moving, reason suggests that powerful forces are holding the stasis. What are the barriers
When you go to the hospital, you probably think you're going to receive the best, most current care. Otherwise, you would not entrust your care to that hospital. Evidence suggests, however, that you might be wrong.
So what's going on? If 'Behavior Therapy' is recommended as a first-line treatment for children with ADHD, and ADHD is "one
The shocking shadow lurking in Berwick's "moral era" made me recall the names of the cascade of reform activities on the way to this reckoning -- and of the shadow each holds. Can this call to purpose rein in the beast?
David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACPM, FACP, FACLM President, American College of Lifestyle Medicine It will come courtesy of those
No one ever expects the Spanish Inquisition. Monty Python said it; it must be true. That the proposition -- the fluid nature
Questionable Accuracy of Poison Exposure Cases Related to "Homeopathic Agents" A total of 259 patients were entered into
• Wellness programs often evaluate employees solely on what actions they claim to have taken and for any specific activity
What makes smarter than average people less smart about their health? We are living longer but not healthier, despite all the attention paid to health in the media. What we need is more funding for food research and better labeling, not less. More responsible journalistic reporting, not more sensational pronouncements.
Despite evidence-based medicine's role as an incredible advancement in the history of medical care and patient management, there remains many challenges that young clinicians must face when attempting to implement EBM into their respective practices.
There is every reason to believe that surgery is especially prone to placebo effects. The more dramatic the procedure, the more likely it raises hope of cure. "Quick, operate before the patient gets better" is one of those jokes that orthopedic surgeons tell among themselves, barely covering a hard truth: that a lot of elective surgery might be unnecessary or even harmful.
SB 95 is an unwarranted and dangerous intrusion into the patient-physician relationship. The bill provides no medical or public health justification for outlawing the safest method of second-trimester abortion in the world today. Thus, one must conclude that the intent is to punish women by relegating them to obsolete care.
The trouble with holistic medicine, or integrative medicine, is less the holes that can be poked in it by self-proclaimed sentinels of evidence, and more our prevailing tendency to gravitate to diametric poles. The best way forward is the road less traveled, which lies, as it often does, in the middle.
Recently, Dr. Peter Kramer published an intriguing, well-written, but poorly reasoned and potentially dangerous "thought piece" in the New York Times. His article, "Why Doctors Need Stories," contains several logical flaws and erroneous arguments, but the overarching concept is a classic "straw man" argument.
Kenneth R. Pelletier, Ph.D., M.D.(hc) -- clinical professor of medicine in the Department of Medicine and professor of public
I'm used to random medical questions from friends and family, but this one really got me. Is knuckle cracking associated with arthritis? To my dismay, I didn't have an educated answer. Until now.
Fibromyalgia is a condition that mimics other diseases (Lyme, lupus, arthritis, to name a few) so doctors who are used to looking for certain types of problems will often miss it altogether. Often, these patients are dismissed as hypochondriacs.
Whether you are faced with decisions in business or where you work, or if you're facing daunting decisions in your personal life, here are the Four Steps that can help you to confidently make better decisions.