Exports

Trump is touting his proposed tariffs on China as a fix for the trade deficit, but it could be American consumers who end up paying.
The conventional map of Africa's development path went more or less like this: transfers of capital and technology would ease people out of farming and into factory jobs around cities, while income from the extraction of oil, gas, and minerals would help governments pay for education, health, and infrastructure.
Unfortunately, we all will suffer if politicians make trade a scapegoat for misguided government policies which have made Americans less competitive.
Because of concerns about energy security and decades of living with energy scarcity, exporting oil has traditionally been controversial.
Although not technically an import, the additional supply of beachfront homes in Cuba might put downward pressure on comparable
To those who tuned in to Donald J. Trump's speech on foreign policy to hear precisely how he would make America economically great again, you're in luck. Trump stated clearly and repeatedly how he would deal with China's "economic assault on American jobs and wealth."
Shailesh Kumar of the Value Stock Guide, a value investment advice service for high-net-worth clients, recently took a position
Like those about to die miserably in Les Miserables, our fearless Fed leader sang the same old song with a few new lines
Bernie Sanders's problem with exports, "because they benefit large corporations," is more than somewhat astounding. Who does he thinks works in all the Boeing plants? Doesn't he realize that a large percent of Boeing shares are owned by various American retirement funds and individual American 401k plans?
For more than 30 years, I have been unearthing problems with the way the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) sells coal that belongs to the American people. Rather than serving the interests of the American taxpayer and the climate, the federal program has done what's best for coal companies.