Fukushima Nuclear Plant

This discovery could mark a turning point in the complicated cleanup of the nuclear facility.
The world commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant catastrophic accident in Ukraine on April 26, 2016.
It's the fifth anniversary of the Fukushima nuclear disaster; the damaged power plant is still leaking 150 tons of water into the ocean every single day, and radiation continues to wash up on the far shores of the Pacific Ocean.
On March 11, 2011, following a massive earthquake and a devastating tsunami, the cores of three of the reactors at Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant melted down with horrific results. Radioactive cesium, with a half-life of 30 years, contaminated almost 12,000 square miles of the country.
How do these events inform us about the future of nuclear power, or its place in addressing climate change? One view is that nuclear power is safe and cost-effective, with long periods of stability and reliability interrupted infrequently by accidents. The other view is that power from the atom is unsafe and costly, with catastrophic accidents separated by periods of stability leading to a false sense of security.
We should do everything in our power to transition the bright minds at IPEC into the clean renewable energy sector in New York, which is growing daily. Let's keep them employed -- and then some. But most importantly, let's keep this country safe.
Japan has since lifted export restrictions, although repeated contaminated water leaks at the Fukushima Daiichi plant prompted
Without respecting and understanding the vital role of human factors in technological systems and proactively addressing/cultivating/facilitating their performance during unexpected events, nuclear safety will only be a distant mirage and recovery will be an unattainable dream.
At the most dire moment of the Fukushima nuclear crisis three years ago, hundreds of panicked employees abandoned the damaged
No surprise, Murakami's first full-length feature film, "Jellyfish Eyes," manages to toe the line between kid flick and horror