micromanaging

As professionals we don’t want to appear weak to our network.
If you haven't worked for these managers, you've heard about them. Employees buzz about these bosses over lunch, complain about them around the water cooler, and chew them up at the dinner table with their spouse. And if these leaders don't get some feedback or training from their superiors, they'll soon cost their organization big bucks because of employee turnover.
While the three words are simple, the concept is a game-changer. If I choose to hold someone else as whole, capable and resourceful, I see that person not as someone to rescue, but a person to respect.
Your children will begin to individuate and make their own decisions, like choosing their course work, becoming involved in sports or clubs, and seeking their identity based on those choices. This is where we as parents need to learn to let go. Micromanaging or helicoptering your children does not help them -- it actually harms them.
Many helicopter bosses feel the need to hover in order to monitor efficiency, or to keep things on track, especially if an employee has erred in the past. But most micromanagers do so out of a need for control that often has more to do with them than the performance of their employees.
Recognize that you may be the problem. Does the word delegate make you wince? Do you feel you have to do it all and keep
The reality is that life unfolds at its own pace and in its own way based on factors a person can control and many that they can't.
The first step towards getting a boss to loosen her grip is to remove any possibility from her mind that she needs to be that way. Get to work on time. Meet deadlines. Be productive. Make clients happy.
After considering the possible reasons for micromanagement, the question to ask yourself is "What can I do about the situation?"
I thought it would be good to remind not-for-profit managers not lose their top talent -- by explaining some things not to do in your intern's first 10 days.