U.S. Treasury Department

Critics see politics at play after Mnuchin's decision not to extend some of the Fed’s expiring emergency loan programs.
Failure to address the crises could result in draconian pension cuts in the future.
International treaties intended to address the problem have limited impact because of the inability to hold signatories accountable
Amid "rampant speculation" of a Hillary Clinton-Elizabeth Warren ticket to head the Democratic slate after their recent joint campaign appearances, here is another speculation.
Chase officials thought "Dash" sounded too much like "Daesh."
It was entirely appropriate that the Treasury Department held its 6th annual Women in Finance & Technology Symposium on St. Patrick's Day, a day symbolized by green. Because green -- as in money -- is what this gathering was all about.
"I continue to hope that Congress can engage in the work of thoughtful housing finance reform before we reach a crisis of
Traces of this other Washington are everywhere. As the new capital was rising from former woods and swampland, slaves labored on many of its buildings, including the White House and the Capitol.
If you want to understand what makes Elizabeth Warren so special in American politics, consider her nervy leadership of the campaign to block President Obama's foolish nomination of one Antonio Weiss to be the top Treasury official in charge of the domestic financial system, including enforcement of the Dodd-Frank Act. For most of his Wall Street career, Weiss has epitomized everything that reeks about financial abuses. As chief of international mergers and acquisitions for Lazard, Weiss orchestrated what are delicately known as "corporate inversions," in which a domestic corporation moves its nominal headquarters offshore, to avoid its U.S. taxes. And that's only the beginning. Many of the other deals orchestrated by Weiss resulted in operating companies being bought and sold by giant conglomerates, where the "savings" and "increased efficiency" came mainly from tax breaks and reduced worker compensation.
WASHINGTON -- A World Bank-backed coal plant in South Africa is seeking to delay the implementation of pollution controls