weekend roundup

We don’t know what Trump will do in power. But we do know how he got there.
While Asia embraces globalization, the popular tide turns against it in the West.
But it all ends badly. History has not absolved the personalist rule of Fidel Castro or any of the others who took the populist path to power.
A Trump administration can’t stop globalization, but it can diminish America’s role in governing it.
By decreasing tensions with China and Russia, the U.S. could prevent the two powers from aligning against the West.
The "Great Reaction" that propelled Donald Trump to the White House is not just another turn of the electoral cycle, but an indication of a system in crisis.
Something is profoundly wrong if spewing out insulting tweets can pave the way to the doorstep of the White House.
The Paris climate accord, signed by 175 countries in April, was a high point of success for the United Nations. The U.N. has also managed to focus governments around the world on sustainable development goals. Yet, on the security side of the equation, for which the U.N. was principally founded, the record is largely one of failure. (continued)
In March 1946, Winston Churchill famously declared that an "iron curtain" had descended across the European continent, casting a decades-long chill between East and West known as the Cold War. A new chill is in the air once again as China and Russia seek to draw a new "digital curtain" across the world in a joint effort to thwart the Western web from penetrating their cultural space.(continued)
This week marks the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe. More than an accident, it was the beginning of the meltdown of the Soviet Union and defrosting of the Cold War. Mikhail Gorbachev has written that Chernobyl "was an historic turning point" and "perhaps the real cause of the collapse of the Soviet Union five years later." The secretive, cover-up culture of the Soviet state, he recalls, kept timely information from getting to the top so a quick response could be formulated. "The Chernobyl disaster, more than anything else," says Gorbachev, "opened the possibility of much greater freedom of expression, to the point that the system as we knew it could no longer continue. It made absolutely clear how important it was to continue the policy of glasnost."(continued)