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bombardier

But not all passengers are mourning the loss.
Despite a few bright spots, the rights workers have struggled for many years to gain are under increased attack.
We cannot allow good jobs to be lost so easily, and with such careless disregard from the government of the United States.
There are concerns the plane could be used to evade the law.
If we really want to encourage cheap flights, industry growth and consumer welfare in airlines, the transport minister's way is definitely the best policy.
We should all welcome the federal government's announcement last week signalling that it wants to continue a mutually beneficial relationship with Boeing.
In its battle with the Government of Canada, Boeing's team has taken a dated approach to its public affairs in the Canadian arena.
Ottawa will buy used Australian F-18 jets instead.
My concern is that Canada is once again letting incredible aerospace innovation slip through our fingers and out of the country.
The U.S. Department of Commerce announced a tariff of more than 200 per cent on Bombardier's C-Series regional jet.
In an age when other national governments are beginning to wrestle with the growing inequities in our global economies, Justin Trudeau has emerged as the ultimate trickle-down cheerleader. He believes that if you look after those at the top of the economic food chain everyone will somehow make do.
To say that Bombardier should be allowed to "crash and burn," as some have, is not only heartless for the thousands of workers and their families who would be left in desperate straits as a result, it is bad economic policy. It is important to remember that Bombardier is one of Canada's largest employers.
As the year draws to a close, it's worth looking back at some of the public policy issues that made headlines over the past 12 months, and that have a good chance of being in the news during the next 12 as well.
Kevin O'Leary premiers his new reality show this weekend -- an all-too real show, in fact. The man who made a name for himself as the loudest and most offensive cast member of the Dragon's Den reality TV show will be testing the waters at the Conservative Party convention this weekend for a possible leadership bid. He would be a terrible leader. Terrible for the Conservatives and terrible for the national debate in this country. Being offensive and insensitive to the very real needs and wishes of Canadians is not leadership and it's certainly not prime ministerial.
Corporate welfare teaches companies and regions that what's important is about getting your "fair cut" of "free" money. And when your cut isn't perceived as fair, it can turn a wasteful policy into a corrosive, emotional weapon to be used by those with regional grievances.
Iran will need 300 new planes, Bombardier estimates.
As debate about federal support for the biggest player in Canada's aerospace industry, Bombardier, has heated up over the last few months, critics have come forward to say that investing in Bombardier would be a mistake, and that the company should be left to sink or swim on its own. They couldn't be more wrong.
Progressive economist Jim Stanford invites us to reimagine Bombardier's demand for another taxpayer handout as an exciting opportunity for an "equity investment." In his view, focusing on the usual metrics for businesses -- such as "does the company make money?" or "can it actually sell the products it makes?" -- is evidence of a dangerous affliction he refers to as "market fundamentalism."
Just thumb through the party's 2009 donor list for a sense of how widespread the practice of awarding contracts to friends has become. Back then, someone must have woke up on New Year's Day with one hell of a hangover -- not from the night before -- but from the bank balance in the B.C. Liberal party's account.
Canada is a vast country with ample resources, however political and economic machinery in this country are not open enough to create true and genuine marketplace for disruptive ideas. Cultural, artistic and intellectual innovation form the foundation of innovative economies. No nation can stay competitive and economically advanced while stagnating culturally and intellectually. Innovation requires taking risk and being open to new ideas. The biggest obstacles in the way of innovation in Canada are regressive and closed institutions.