Real Life. Real News. Real Voices.
Help us tell more of the stories that matter from voices that too often remain unheard.
Join HuffPost Plus
THE BLOG

The Best Regional Slang Worlds From Around the Country

We as a nation have embraced all kinds of dumb slang, from "swag" to "hepcat." (Never mind, hepcat is awesome.) But some words never get out of specific pockets of America, where they easily weed out the locals from the transplants.
This post was published on the now-closed HuffPost Contributor platform. Contributors control their own work and posted freely to our site. If you need to flag this entry as abusive, send us an email.

We as a nation have embraced all kinds of dumb slang, from "swag" to "hepcat." (Never mind, hepcat is awesome.) But some words never get out of specific pockets of America, where they easily weed out the locals from the transplants. Because we have an affinity for funny words and inside jokes, we rounded up a few of our favorites from all over the US. Brush up on your vocab before joining us at the "pre-funk."

Jawn
Philadelphia, PA
What it means: Almost anything. "Jawn" could be a person (i.e. "I was talking to this jawn..."), a song (i.e. "You hear that new Drake jawn?"), or even a collapsed building (i.e. this real news story).
Should we all start using it? Only if we want to confuse the hell out of the general public.

Bubbler
Wisconsin
What it means: A drinking fountain. The name supposedly comes from the local Kohler Co., which made fountains with a "bubbling valve" in the middle of the bowl in 1915. People started calling the things "bubblers," and the term was soon applied to any drinking fountain. (Also, while this is mostly a WI word, it pops up in Portland and pockets of New England as well.)
Should we all start using it? It's shorter and more whimsical than "water fountain," so sure, why not!

Cattywampus
The South
What it means: All out of sorts, askew, craaaazy.
Should we all start using it? If it's good enough for Mr. Krabs, it's good enough for us.

Pre-funk
Pacific Northwest
What it means: Pre-game. As in, drinking before another event that likely involves more drinking.
Should we all start using it?Obviously the rest of the country already has a word for that, but "funk" is more appealing than "game," so let's go for it.

Tump (over)
Texas
What it means: To tip, fall, or spill over. While some people peg this term solely to Texas, it also has a big following in Arkansas and other Southern states.
Should we all start using it? It is kinda funny that it's practically an onomatopoeia of the action (thump), and since we've been hung up on onomatopoeia since that one spelling bee, we're going to say yes.

Shoots
Hawaii
What it means: A general affirmative, like "yeah." Can be followed with "then" or "brah." One of the more all-purpose words from Hawaii's pidgin slang.
Should we all start using it? Shoots, brah.

Trixie
Chicago, IL
What it means: As we've previously explained, a "Trixie" is a former sorority sister who lives in Lincoln Park, organizes bar crawls, and dates a Chad (the male version of her).
Should we all start using it? It's incredibly specific to the area, so probably not. But you're welcome to try.

2015-07-08-1436379744-5762315-slang_3.jpeg
Credit: Flickr/6SN7

Leaf peepers
New England
What it means: Those tourists who come to take selfies with all the fall foliage. Sometimes it's used affectionately. Sometimes it's not.
Should we all start using it? The word "peepers" sounds downright filthy in any context, even if we're talking about trees. (Or the formal cat name, Mr. Peepers.) Please no.

More from Thrillist:

Like Thrillist on Facebook: www.facebook.com/Thrillist