Abu Ghraib

The long-running case seeks to hold accountable a military contractor blamed for egregious abuses.
More than a billion Muslims of all races, colors, languages, and nationalities celebrating the ending of the month of fasting, the holy Ramadan, all over the world, can no longer tolerate the bands of criminals supposedly acting in the name of Islam.
The military released 198 photos, a small part of those sought by the ACLU that purport to show damning detainee abuse.
Before jumping on the "tough on terrorism" bandwagon, candidates should reflect on the lessons learned in the 14 years since the 9/11 terror attacks, and consider what actually works to counter this global problem - and what doesn't.
Presidential candidate Jeb Bush has confessed, given what we know now, he would not have authorized the invasion of Iraq, as his brother did. A politician with integrity should have followed that comment with an apology to the Iraqi people.
Even if torture works, it's a really, really bad idea. That anyone does it is appalling. That American psychologists participate in and endorse torture is outrageous. The APA and its adherents lose any semblance of credibility.
When it comes to research into human behavior in groups, one of the most notable, foundational studies is the 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment. While it was scheduled to last longer, the experiment was cut short after six days when the guards began to abuse the prisoners.
What is special about the The Stanford Prison Experiment movie is the way it enables viewers to look through the observation window as if they were part of the prison staff watching this remarkable drama slowly unfold, and simultaneously observe those observers as well.
Unlike most filmic reenactments of real-life events in which considerable poetic license is taken to punch up the drama, none is needed for this film because the subjects themselves produced enough gravitas to keep the narrative arc moving toward its shattering conclusion.
What shocks me is how shocked my professional community suddenly seems to be, since much of the information in the Hoffman report has been available to the public for many years, thanks to the ceaseless work of activist psychologists like Steven Reisner, Stephen Soldz, and Jean Maria Arrigo, who first blew the whistle on the APA's cover up back in 2006.
This is Sy Hersh. He is irascible, iconoclastic, irrepressible, difficult, passionate -- and still angry about governmental lies. And he is usually right.
Judith Miller recently popped out of the Fox News bubble for a quick jaunt to the Wall Street Journal editorial page, the home base for John Bolton, Max Boot, and other neo-con hawks, to give her forthcoming book a little free advertising. In the process she attempts to whitewash her role as an influential pro-war voice in the lead-up to the Iraq War.
"The photos are crucial to the public record," said Jameel Jaffer, ACLU deputy legal director. "They're the best evidence
That includes Human Rights Watch advocacy director John Sifton, who spoke with HuffPost Live's Ricky Camilleri on Monday
When torturers make a person scream in agony, Christ shrieks too. The Passion gets re-enacted. Christ suffers all over again, because torture is a hideous assault on both humans and God.
Mr. Obama, in ruling out prosecution for torture, may have thought he spared us bother, but actually he did us harm. By casting accountability into limbo, he makes possible government-sponsored torture in the future and prevents America from recovering the thing most precious: our good name.
So what's left for the country's torture apologists? Continue to claim that the program saved lives and discredit the report for relying too much on the CIA's own emails and cables, rather than interviews. What they likely won't do is admit and defend the version of waterboarding described by the Senate Intelligence Committee.