all the way

While the Oscar and Emmy awards salute creative achievement, there is a more recent honors program which salutes Hollywood's shining history and its current renaissance as the greatest place in the world to make filmed entertainment. It's called MIHH, and its news for this year is optimistic.
“I didn’t want to put on prosthetics and a fat suit, because I feel like that would’ve been disrespectful to the legacy of Dr. King.”
The rampant Johnsonization of the Civil Rights Act, a law that was in fact achieved through the efforts of many people and in a more interesting and impressive way, has been taking place on Broadway, in Robert Schenkkan's popular play, All the Way, now being released as a film on HBO.
A friend invited me to a performance of All the Way at Seattle Repertory Theatre, and I expected an intellectually interesting performance examining the first year of Lyndon Baines Johnson's (LBJ) presidency.
To my mind, Jimmy Cannon was the greatest sports writer who ever lived. I read his columns in the New York Post avidly and religiously. When he wasn't writing about sports, he was musing, offering his personal, mostly one- or two-liner opinions, about anything that hit his off-the-charts observant eye. Most had little to do with sports.
Walter White may not be back, but Bryan Cranston is returning to the small screen. After taking a break from TV following
M&M's. I have written a lot about eating in the theater. Starting in 2007 with this Times story and continuing on as more
Broadway is having a banner year, and for the first time in a while, new American plays are a significant part of the lineup. If you let it wash through you, this surreal and satisfying one act has more to say about modern existence than could ever be conveyed simply with plot.
My friends are never very excited about new plays. What is The Realistic Joneses and why did celebrities want to be in it? Is Casa Valentina an atmospheric production where they treat us like we're in a resort?