chemotherapy hair loss

Walk a day in my shoes. Feel my fear that I'm going to lose this fight. That I might never see my children grow up, go to school, win their first competition, really talk to them, dance at their weddings. Feel sad that my children might never really know me.
Recently, on New Year's Day, I got out of bed with just a trace of a hangover, ran my fingers through my hair, and took a bunch of strands with me to the bathroom. What a way to start 2016, right? It got worse from there.
Scalp cooling caps could help breast cancer patients keep their hair.
If I have learned anything from all of this it is patience and to live in the present. As it is, my hair will grow back and I will look differently to others. Appearances aside, I do know I am a woman who is stronger and more beautiful than I was before I was diagnosed a year and half ago.
Though she says she doesn't have plans to knit any more "hair," Capitolo says she'll wear the piece to her chemo treatment
Together, my son and his hat charmed and brought joy to the many cold, sterile, and terrifying situations we had to endure.
But how could I have known that in fact my head is well-shaped, not too big, not too small, no distracting lumps or bumps, scars or curious protuberances. How could I have known how delightful the buzz was to touch?
“If you can keep your hair, look in the mirror and don’t look sick, it’s very important for feeling better," said Dr. Sara
...to show off some badass dance moves in front of her surgical team. Deborah Cohen, Ob/Gyn and Beyoncé fan, rocked out to
Waiting for each hair to go was like death by a thousand cuts. So on the fifth day of the exodus my husband Harlan got the buzzer and the razor, and I was G.I. Jen. Up to this point I hadn't felt like a sick person. Now I looked in the mirror and saw Cancer Girl.
I paid as much mind to my hair and face as I had to the wounds I had been dressing, performing rituals of grooming I had nearly forgotten. My heart swelled, and after a year of cellular and spiritual purging, I suddenly felt full.
While individual health care decisions in the wake of a cancer diagnosis belong to the patient, there are some questions that my mother asked -- or didn't know to ask until things went awry -- that may be helpful for others to keep in mind when chemotherapy is presented as an option.
What have unexpectedly descended are "The Scarf Stares." Whoa. They came out of nowhere and, I've found, are a significant part of the oncology culture.
Because I seem to be the poster child for chemotherapy side effects (i.e. I've experienced ALL of them), it didn't come as a complete shock to me that hair loss was next on the list.