college jobs

I'm a college student who is going back to camp.
Getting to know the type of environment in which you'll be working will help you acclimate to the job more quickly and contribute
Chances are that at some point in your life, you or someone you know has been afflicted by this difficult malady. Someday, you will undoubtedly experience 'A Strong Desire to Skip Work.'
For men of color, the daily reality on campus and in the workplace is one of struggle and marginalization. Men of color are often concentrated into "non-choice" jobs during college that inhibit their academic success.
As automation replaces jobs, we may need a guaranteed minimum income for all people, regardless of employment status.
The less parents know about our jobs, the more nervous they become. And as seemingly every job becomes more technical and digital, it's like we speak a different language from our moms and dads.
Students tend to think while in the classroom they are learning everything they need to know to be successful on their job. I have spoken to so many people who have made the statement that you don't actually learn your field until you're actually working in it.
While some criticize unpaid internships as disenfranchising to the poor who are often unable to afford the luxury of working without pay, it provides work experience and eases student entry into the labor market.
The upside to a disappointing internship is that internships typically have a set duration. You're never truly "stuck" in any situation, but internships are especially temporary.
I've had a couple of jobs I hated most of the time. But I learned an awful lot at the one I hated most.
You don't know me. I work behind the counter at your university's campus center. I make your sandwiches and wraps. I wear a baseball cap and that ugly unisex tee shirt. I also get paid heinously low wages. I am your local employed college student.
You showed up on time, dressed to impress, and your answers to every question the interviewer asked you were flawless. Now the end of the interview is drawing near, and the interviewer is about to ask you his last question: "Do you have any questions for me?"
Rachel Tannenbaum, associate director for student programming for Barnard College Career Development, says phrases like this
In today's competitive job search, you could be battling 100 other qualified candidates for a position. The only way to get the job is to catch the eye of the interviewers. Here are seven ways you can distinguish yourself from the pack during your job search.
Any job you take during college is a good one.That's because it shows employers you can balance school and work at the same time. The best college jobs, though, are the ones that help you land the career you want, right after you've graduated.
Thousands of college students are finishing internships this month before heading back to their campuses. If you were one of those students lucky enough to land a selective internship at a top company, these last few days on the job are critical.
Craft a strong resume that says you're ready for the workforce. Here are seven tips to help you send the right message to prospective employers with your resume.
If you look at the current employment numbers there is a quality job out there for just about every graduate -- if only they would have been guided toward courses of study that would give them the skills most in demand.
But some black college presidents say socioeconomic realities in black communities often force the issue in the desire to