deadlines

It has finally happened. You are adrift. A raft of badly lashed-together memories and a few fairly buoyant facts: That watercraft is you. But thanks to an article in The Brown Daily Herald, the Ivy League university's student paper, you are listing badly. You are at sea.
As an athlete I've trained for marathons, triathlons and adventure runs for twelve years and counting. By participating in these events I have drawn parallels from running that contribute to achieving successful business goals.
Imagine your life with fewer deadlines? How would you spend that precious time?
Time is as richly complex as culture itself. For task-oriented people, such as the Swiss, time might be seen as linear -- rigid, plannable, organized into blocks, systematic.
Writers are always prone to be overly busy with projects -- it might be the existential fear that is programmed into their minds (that is, if they are not Stephen King), as they often times do not know where the next project will come from.
Linwood Barclay's thrillers have been international bestsellers. Trust Your Eyes, an intriguing novel with a unique premise, has been optioned for film. The Associated Press said, "Linwood Barclay has established himself alongside the masters of suburban fiction."
I had the privilege of talking with her about what makes her tick as an author, how she keeps the ideas coming and the power of friendship, romance and love.
Deadlines have their advantages, but creativity may not be one of them.
Never shy of a little hard work, I am very happy to roll up my sleeves and make it happen. But when the work is tied to a fixed deadline it triggers my worry and anxiety. This leads to cloudiness and inefficiency. Adding in the final part of the equation, not being able to complete the work on my own, and we have the trifecta of stress.
Running our daily lives according to the clock puts control of the day's events outside of us, explained Sellier. This can