glen hansard

By their very nature, successful musicals can generate royalties for their investors for many years after the show's initial run. If a stage musical becomes a big hit, the chances are pretty good that it will make it to the silver screen.
Should we love something just because it's hummable and memorable (i.e. anything by The Weekend)? Or should we expect more out of a song (like when Adele shows us greatness)? Is there room for both approaches?
Although many of these stories are marketed to the public for the upswing of the story cycle (when two people meet and start to feel all tingly about each other), they often fail to mention the downside of the story.
How did a guy who typically delves into more disturbing psychological waters in his work manage to come up for some creative levity for Once. Burning questions. I learned about that and more.
Oscar-winning Irish folk musician Glen Hansard on Monday evening returned to Chicago's Millennium Park -- where he last played
The alcohol, I guess, prodded many to request, "Jeremy!" the title of a huge Pearl Jam '90s hit. "Play Jeremy! Jeremy!" they yelled as the poor fellow attempted to speak to us about depression, love, PTSD, a dear friend's death and most crucially, the word empathy.
2012-10-12-Screenshot20121012at1.18.24PM.jpgTruly unaffected by fame and recognition, Glen remains most motivated by his pure love of musical expression and the importance of connecting with his audience.
The final mix recently went up and is currently open for guesses. All we know is that we heard Les Claypool and Willie Nelson