holocaust survivors

'Shabbat Across AO' has become an annual practice, this year at the Kosciuszko Foundation located on New York's Upper East
There's no doubt that anti-Semitism is alive and well in Lithuania today. Yet an opposite tendency - a desire among Lithuanians to remember and honor the Jewish past - is also plain to see.
The passing of Elie Wiesel serves as a timely reminder that one day soon Holocaust survivors will no longer be able to tell their own stories.
New York City Council Rally For Support of Funding For Holocaust Survivors From left: Karen Spar Kasner, UJA-Federation of
Nearly 75 years ago, the Nazis launched Operation Barbarossa, a massive invasion of the Soviet Union, in which 4.5 million Axis soldiers surprised the Soviets with blitzkrieg attacks across the 2,900-kilometer border.
Growing up in New York, I had a view of the world similar to the old Steinberg poster: after Broadway and Columbus and Central Park came 5th Avenue and then came California and then China and Australia in the distant horizon.
I hear many angry voices in the world but I am not angry. I understand the anger but I never let it take me over. When we start restricting people based on religion -- we are going down the very pathway my mother describes, and we seem to be forgetting the past.
"It said he died in the synagogue on Pesach. When I asked my father, he said he remembered when it happened. I know the story
It is the silent, the inactive, who allow tyrants to have their way. I want the Democrats, the Independents and the moderate Republicans to listen. Because if we all take part in the political process, if we all speak out, if we all vote, then these few months can be an aberration in our history rather then the beginning of a disaster.
Ending the occupation is not a charitable gift to the Palestinians. Only by accepting their right to a state of their own will Israel remain a Jewish and democratic state enjoying peace and security, instead of being drawn toward an abyss from which there is no salvation.
January 27th will mark International Holocaust Remembrance Day. The date chosen marks the liberation of Auschwitz by Soviet
Dagmar Lieblova is Holocaust survivor and the chairperson and cofounder of the Terezin Initiative. Lieblova was 14 years old when she and her family were transported to Auschwitz. Lan Anh Vu sat down with Lieblova to hear more about her survival story: a testament to the resilience and strength of the human spirit.
Seventy-five years ago, Joseph Stalin's henchmen (the NKVD) came pounding on my Polish family's door in Eastern Poland. It wasn't until 2012, after a series of serendipitous events, that I decided it was time for me to do some knocking on a few doors myself -- the doors of history.
English professor and social anthropologist Jonathan Webber may not have known the full extent of his actions when he first felt compelled to rebuild a cemetery in the bucolic Polish town of Brzostek, where his grandfather was born.
What would it feel like to have no family tree? To not know who your parents were, or where you come from? In so many ways, our families define us.
"We are the last generation that's going to be able to hear their stories first hand."
Growing up in Chicago in the 1970s, I was aware that my parents were Polish immigrants. My father, William Krzos, was an engineer at GTE -- I was intrigued by his vague remarks about being in a German labor camp.