one-man show

Performer James Lecesne's latest one-man show confirms what everyone has known for two decades or more: he's a terrific performer.
Not since John Leguizamo's Ghetto Klown have I been this entertained. I was so enthralled with Joseph Assadourian's performance in The Bullpen that I gladly became a repeat offender, three times. He has received accolades as one of the top 20 Off-Broadway shows of 2014.
How was it that my best friend's parents could afford a new car and an annual trip to Disney World when we had a ten-year-old Ford Taurus and vacationed at a campsite where the most exciting feature was a public pool?
Shifting from autobiography to biography, Fry breathes fresh life into one of history's greatest minds (much like Val Kilmer's brilliant channeling of Mark Twain) with the funny, touching, and intimate, Einstein! at Hollywood's Lounge Theatre Fridays and Saturdays through November 22.
Tanner confesses he still doesn't know where he fits into Hollywood, and that he's never been the kind of actor who waits for the phone to ring -- so he's created his own production company, the first project being Small Parts.
Collins' influence stretches beyond the festive hand tossing of Tinseltown glitter, however. Her charitable outreach -- from The National Center for Learning Disabilities to the prevention of child cruelty in the UK -- stand out.
Benjamin Franklin, the man and founding father, was a pain to many and a pleasure to more than a few. Lesko brought Franklin
There's a time and a place to see The Lion King, and a time and a place to sit in a small theater, inches away from a great actor, who brings you face to face with nature, red in tooth and claw.
700 Sundays is emotionally riveting, uproariously funny, and altogether lovely. I found it smashingly good in 2004 and somehow more gripping last night, perhaps because Mr. Crystal is nine years older (as are those of us who saw it nine years ago).
With Held (the title is a pun both apt and suggestive) is the work of local playwright Jeremy Greco, who delivers a bravura take on the life and sexual adventures of his friend, the contemporary artist John Held Jr.