Penn & Teller

"I get no credit or blame for Teller not speaking," Penn says.
I love a success story. Just two years ago, the unique TV series City Walk took its first steps, exploring urban environments from Portland to New York City in a hip, revisionist way: by strolling them.
As this entertaining and touching nonfiction film reveals, that has been Randi's most important work over the years: debunking charlatans who profit from their supposed ability to contact the dead or otherwise harness the supernatural. 
Teller broke his silence and told me all about magic, his successful career, why he's a master of the selfie and more.
When the Frick Museum featured "Girl with a Pearl Earring" in "Vermeer, Rembrandt, and Hals: Masterpieces of Dutch Painting
Penn and Teller's Tim's Vermeer is like a cinematic magic trick, one that unveils itself over the course of roughly 90 minutes -- and encompasses the years it took Tim Jenison to work the illusion. Except it's not an illusion.
Modestly successful in his lifetime, then relatively forgotten, Vermeer was rediscovered in the 19th Century. He has since become regarded as a grand master.
For years now, their fans had been clamoring for these two to do produce some sort of seasonal spectacular. A Halloween maze or haunted house that perfectly captured this team's twisted sensibilities.
Fool Me Once, is what Rick Lax acknowledges to be a "stunt" memoir: "Your publisher pays you to go out and have an adventure. You're getting paid $20,000 to go to Las Vegas. What's better than that?"