Six-Day War

Recognition of the disputed land would mark a dramatic shift in U.S. policy and boost Benjamin Netanyahu's re-election bid.
The move would make it harder for Israel to cede control over parts of Jerusalem in any peace deal with the Palestinians.
Recognizing the city as Israel's official capital wold be "the red line of Muslims," according to Turkey.
A web of formal and informal Israeli-Arab relations and common fears of renewed popular uprisings that could threaten regimes
In June of 1967, I was in the midst of my final weeks in college when the war broke out. At the time, I knew little about
Fiftieth anniversary commemorations of Israel’s June 1967 Six-Day war have conveyed popular misgivings about the occupation
This is a revised and updated version of an article that originally appeared in In These Times on February 17, 2017 It was
Mention history and it can trigger a roll of the eyes. Add the Middle East to the equation and folks might start running for the hills, unwilling to get caught up in the seemingly bottomless pit of details and disputes. But without an understanding of what happened in the past, it's impossible to grasp where we are today.
This week marks the 48th anniversary of the Six-Day War in Israel. It is the anniversary of the state of euphoria which existed in Israel after the defeat of so many of its neighbors. After all, some months before June, 1967, people were not sure if the State would survive and in fact mass graves were prepared, just in case.
Forty-eight years ago this week, the Six-Day War broke out. While some wars fade into obscurity, this one remains as relevant today as in 1967. Many of its core issues remain unresolved and in the news.
Now onto the film itself. When I tell you that a film based on voice recordings and archival photography, interwoven with touching cinematic portraits of the soldiers today can indeed be a spellbinding masterpiece, believe me.
The public discussion about the causes of violent extremism has focused mainly on the socioeconomic and political conditions that exist in Arab countries. But we must also carefully consider how the events in the wake of World Wars I and II have impacted the psychological disposition of the Arab population throughout the Middle East.
One of the brightest, loudest, flashing neon-style sign that humanity can indeed get along is the upcoming Middle East Now festival in Florence, Italy. Yes, Florence, where that original coming out of the Middle Ages happened hundreds of years ago, is the city I believe could also be at the epicenter of a new cross-cultural Renaissance.
So we have yet another crisis in a little-known place to worry about. The difference is that, with this one, it's not hard at all to see how it could trigger a regional conflagration.
Declassified high-level documents from Britain, France, Russia and the United States reveal that Egypt, Syria, and Jordan were not going to attack Israel and Israel knew it. In fact, they did not attack Israel. Instead, Israel mounted the first attack in order to decimate the Egyptian army and take the West Bank.
Has a once venerated idealistic enterprise itself become the victim of extremism? Are Israel's enemies using it as a pawn in yet another messianic struggle that goes far beyond the questions of a two state solution or whether the country's borders should be returned to where they were before the Six Day War?
There is no ethnicity to suffering. The more we delay this understanding, the more we delay peacemaking and democratic state building. No one wins.
We all pray for peace. We seek the harmony and tranquility of universal brotherhood. But we are well aware that at times the only way to achieve peace is through a just, defensive war.