Watership Down

Richard Adams knew his book would frighten kids. And that's why he wrote it.
The book sold millions of copies and captivated a generation of children.
We know today, some popular writers employ a "formula" such as fast-pacing, short sentences and chapters, and simple language, hoping to achieve success. Would I, as a novelist, seriously consider changing the manner in which I write? The easy answer is: No.
Ever since I was old enough to have self-deprecating thoughts, I've been aware of one fundamental truth: British people are better than me. They've got cooler accents, more interesting hair, come naturally dressed in layers, and they're both funnier and more miserable than anyone has a right to be.
Here's the latest video by the Chop Shop Records' act Scars On 45, the title track to their Give Me Something EP.
From Achilles' horse to Lassie, animals provide moral authority and sympathy in fiction, often giving voice to the silenced
One of my favorite books of all time is "Watership Down." In that story, the main action of the book ends with around 20
Ever since Sawyer was shown reading "Watership Down" in Season One of "Lost," an abundance of carefully placed works of literature