St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Danni Messina offered to pay for every like and retweet her tweet received. Then she went viral.
I was 14 years old when I learned I had cancer, but the scariest feeling was before my diagnosis when I didn't know what
This year the parents of nearly 16,000 children in the United States will hear these devastating words: Your child has cancer
For the fourth year in a row, the Rock 'N Roll Marathon Series is partnering with St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, with this rockin' race being held in the one and only music city, Nashville.
Somewhere, right now, there is a family packing up the car to drive to St. Jude. Their world has been turned upside down and their child is hurting.
On the morning of April 30, 2016 I'll be standing among 30,000 people in downtown Nashville, as we prepare to race various distances as part of the St. Jude Rock N' Roll Nashville Marathon and Half-Marathon. It's an incredible sight to see all of those people packing the streets of downtown Nashville, with seemingly no square foot of concrete left uncovered.
One patient got to hang out with wild horses and another dug up fossils.
Rachel Harris was there with her fundraising team, the St. Jude Dudes at the annual pre-race pasta dinner for St. Jude Heroes. It was held in early December, on the night before the 2015 St. Jude Memphis Marathon.
Chips and dip? Check. Big screen TV? Check. A Super Bowl party that gives back? Of course!
You've had enough of seeing friends and family in your newsfeed posing at finish lines, flashing bling-y medals, with huge wide grins on their faces. You've finally decided you're done being the race spectator, and you're ready to be the race participant.
Donate at St. Jude and visit the site to learn more, and be sure to shop and dine with participating partners. Richard Shadyac
A pain crisis is hard to put into words. Every person with sickle cell disease describes it differently. For me, it is a sharp, excruciating pain that runs throughout my entire body.
It is estimated that nearly 10 percent of children with cancer have the disease because, like Megan, they carry predisposing gene mutations. That percentage may be even higher, because some children carry genetic mutations that have not yet been identified.
Each September is "Childhood Cancer Awareness" month. This acknowledgement of a problem means more than beautiful photos of smiling bald children. It highlights the urgency of generating action to eliminate cancer as the leading cause of death by disease for American children.
How does one sleep when the to-do list has been wiped clean except for one task "save my son's life?"
After two-and-a-half years of treatment, I made the important transition from cancer patient to cancer survivor. My experience made me realize that I wanted to be a doctor and help children through their cancer journeys.