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8 Amazing Buildings Perched Near Volcanos

The villa's basalt slabs, formed from ancient volcanic activity, emerge organically from the cliff and dramatically frame the distant mountains.
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By Katherine Wisniewski, Architectural Digest.

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(photo: courtesy of Jorge Javier Andrade Benítez)

QUILOTOA SHALALÁ OVERLOOK, ZUMBAHUA, ECUADOR
Architects Javier Mera Luna, Daniel Moreno Flores, and Jorge Javier Andrade Benítez designed this vertigo-inducing overlook, which is perched on the edge of the nearly two-mile-wide crater of a volcano in the Ecuadorian Andes.

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(photo: courtesy of Spasm Design)

SPASM DESIGN'S KHOPOLI HOUSE, KHOPOLI, INDIA
Mumbai firm Spasm Design took a cue from the basalt outcroppings that dot India's Maharashtrian countryside in order to create the minimalist Khopoli House. The villa's basalt slabs, formed from ancient volcanic activity, emerge organically from the cliff and dramatically frame the distant mountains.

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(photo: courtesy of Arkibúllan)

ARKIBÚLLAN'S GUFUNES CEMETERY OFFICES, REYKJAVÍK, ICELAND
This basalt-clad building, devised by the Icelandic architecture firm Arkibúllan, was the first of many contemporary additions to Reykjavík's Gufunes cemetery. The basalt comes from the region's Eyjafjallajökull volcano.

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(photo: courtesy of Foldes Architects)

FÖLDES ARCHITECTS' KEMENES VOLCANO PARK VISITOR CENTER, CELLDÖMÖLK, HUNGARY
This Budapest-based studio designed a hulking testament to Hungary's volcanic past in the shadow of Ság Hill--a five-million-year-old former volcano. The firm utilized industrial materials such as Cor-Ten steel and charcoal-gray concrete.

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(photo: courtesy of Barbosa & Guimães Architects)

BARBOSA & GUIMARÃES ARCHITECTS' MUNICIPAL POOL COMPLEX, POVOAÇÃO, PORTUGAL
A charcoal-hued pool complex rises from the ashes of a former sports field in Povoação, Portugal--a town know for its volcanic beach. Slabs of monolithic-sized basalt rock emerge from the nearby hillside and run alongside the slope as if a continuation of it.

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(photo: courtesy of EDAA)

EDAA'S CASA MEZTITLA, TEPOZTLÁN, MEXICO
Perched in the foothills of Tepozteco Mountain and surrounded by blooms of bougainvillea, this residence is clad in volcanic stone and lush pine. The natural materials help the home blend seamlessly into the setting.

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(photo: courtesy of EON)

EON'S MT. HEKLA MUSEUM, RANGÁRÞING YTRA, ICELAND
The architecture firm EON transformed a former farm into this geological museum, set in the shadow of Iceland's volcanic Mt. Hekla. The 6,500-square-foot building begins with a subterranean descent into a cave beneath the valley's lava fields, which takes visitors through the history of Iceland's most volatile volcano.

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